November 25, 2015

The Perect Thanksgiving Dessert

If Turducken is Gluttony 101 then Piecaken is the Masters Thesis. A pie inside a cake layered on another pie inside another cake. As many layers as you like with as many different combinations as you can think up. Decadent and delicious! Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Posted By: patty - Wed Nov 25, 2015 - Comments (2)
Category: Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Food, Junk Food, Holidays

Can’t Miss the Show

January 1985: The women of the Thurlow family proved they were serious fans of the TV show St. Elsewhere. Even as their house burned down around them, they remained parked in front of the TV set, watching the latest episode through the haze of the smoke, unwilling to miss a single moment. The firefighters had to drag them away. But as soon as the fire was extinguished, the women rushed back into the house and were able to catch the final 10 minutes.

Ocala Star-Banner - Jan 23, 1985

Posted By: Alex - Wed Nov 25, 2015 - Comments (5)

Mystery Illustration 13


Which corporation--still around today--felt that this technological monster symbolized all the services they provided, back in 1969?

The answer is here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 25, 2015 - Comments (7)
Category: Technology, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1960's

November 24, 2015

Safety Glass Tester, 1939

High-test safety glass was developed jointly by five American companies during the 1930s. It had an inner layer of polyvinyl acetal resin. This meant that you could smash a man's face into a pane of the glass, and it would crack but not shatter. As demonstrated by the safety-glass tester below.

Image source: Newsweek - Apr 10, 1939

Posted By: Alex - Tue Nov 24, 2015 - Comments (7)
Category: Jobs and Occupations, 1930's

The Escorts


Full story here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Nov 24, 2015 - Comments (2)
Category: Crime, Music, 1970's

November 23, 2015

Life (Death) Hack

British lady tried out a life hack she read about on Facebook with unfortunate results.The suggestion was to lay the toaster on its side to make cheese on toast instead of grilling it. The idea back fired nearly destroying her kitchen before fire fighters arrived to put out the blaze. Life Hack: Using a toaster on its side to make cheese toast. Result: Epic Fail!

Posted By: patty - Mon Nov 23, 2015 - Comments (2)
Category: Accidents, Goofs and Screw-ups, Food

Amish Marathon Runner

Apparently the Amish practice of "plain dress" extends to marathon running, because Amish runner Leroy Stolzfus has been showing up to races dressed in a long-sleeved shirt, black slacks, and suspenders. However, he does wear sneakers. More: York Dispatch.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 23, 2015 - Comments (11)
Category: Fashion, Religion, Sports

November 22, 2015

News of the Weird (November 22, 2015)

News of the Weird
Weirdnuz.M450, November 22, 2015
Copyright 2015 by Chuck Shepherd. All rights reserved.

Lead Story

Professional patients now help train would-be doctors, especially in the most delicate and dreaded of exams (gynecological and prostate), where a becalming technique improves outcomes. One “teaching associate” of Eastern Virginia Medical School told the Washington Post in September that the helpers act as “enthusiastic surgical dummies” to 65 medical colleges, guiding rookie fingers through the trainer’s own private parts. The prostate associate might helpfully caution, “No need for speed here,” especially since he will be bending over for as many as nine probings a day. A Gynecological Teaching Associate, mentoring the nervous speculum-wielder, might wittily congratulate pupils on having a front-row sight line the GTA will never witness: an up-close view of her own cervix. [Washington Post, 9-3-2015]

Latest Religious Messages

American Sharia: (1) U.S. parents have a right to home-school their kids, but subject to varying degrees of regulation, with Texas the most lax, and one El Paso family will have a day before the Texas Supreme Court after one of its kids was reported declining to study because education was useless since he was waiting to be “Raptured” (as described in the Bible’s Book of Revelation). (2) U.S. courts increasingly allow customers to sign away state and federal rights by agreeing to contracts providing private arbitration for disputes rather than access to courts--even if the contract explicitly requires only religious resolutions rather than secular, constitutional ones. A November New York Times investigation examined contracts ranging from Scientology’s requirement that fraud claims by members be resolved only by Scientologists--to various consumer issues from home repairs to real estate sales limited to dockets of Christian clerics. [Associated Press via Dallas Morning News, 11-1-2015] [New York Times, 11-3-2015]

Leading Economic Indicators

First-World Spending: According to estimates released by the National Retail Federation in September, 157 million Americans “planned to celebrate” Halloween, spending a total of $6.9 billion, of which $2.5 billion would be on costumes, including $350 million dressing up family pets. [National Retail Federation press release, 9-23-2015]

At a ceremony in Kabul in November, prominent Afghan developer Khalilullah Frozi signed a $95 million contract to build an 8,800-unit township and was, according to a New York Times dispatch, toasted for his role in the country’s economic rebirth. However, af nightfall, Frozi headed back to prison, to resume his 15-year sentence for defrauding Kabul Bank of nearly $1 billion in depositors’ money. Because he remains one of Afghanistan’s elite, arrangements were made for him to work days but spend his nights in prison (in comfortable quarters). Said one Western official, laconically, “[I]f you have stolen enough money, you can get away with it.” [New York Times, 11-4-2015]

Cultural Diversity

Before the terrorist murders gripped Paris, President Hollande and Iran’s President Rouhani had been trying to arrange a formal dinner during Rouhani’s upcoming visit to the city, to celebrate the two countries’ role in the recent accord limiting Iran’s nuclear development. France’s RTL radio news reported that “dinner” is apparently more vexing than “nuclear weaponry”--as Rouhani demanded an alcohol-free meal, which was nixed by Hollande, who insisted that the French never dine without wine. [Washington Times, 11-11-2015]

Compelling Explanations

Skeptics feared it was just a matter of time, anyway, until the “political correctness” movement turned its attention to dignity for thieves. San Francisco’s reported in November on a discussion in an upscale neighborhood about whether someone committing petty, nonviolent theft should be referred to by the “offensive” term “criminal” (rather than as, for example, “the person who stole [my bicycle],” since “criminal” implies a harsher level of evil and fails to acknowledge factors that might have caused momentary desperation by a person in severe need). [, 11-2-2015]

Reginald Gildersleeve, 55 and free on bond with an extensive rap sheet, was waving a gun as he threatened a clerk and tried to rob a store in Chicago on Halloween night--until a customer (licensed to carry) drew his own gun and, with multiple shots, killed Gildersleeve. Closer inspection revealed Gildersleeve’s weapon to be merely a paintball gun, leading the deceased man’s stepson to complain later that “Some people [the licensed shooter] don’t actually know how to use guns.” “They go to firing ranges, but it’s not the same . . . as a bullet going into flesh.” “Someone’s got to answer for that.” [USA Today, 11-2-2015]

The Continuing Crisis

U.S. and European entrepreneurs offer extreme “games” in which liability-waiving “players” volunteer for hours of kidnaping, pain, and death threats, but the cult-like, under-the-radar “McKamey Manor” in southern California (said to have a waiting list of 27,000) is notable for the starkness of its threats of brutality--and the absence of any “safe word” with which a suddenly-reluctant player can beg off. (Only Russ McKamey, himself, decides if a player has had enough.) The “product” is “100 percent fear,” he said. “We’re good at it,” he told London’s The Guardian in an October dispatch from San Diego (whose reporter overheard one of McKamey’s thugs promise, “I’m going to tear that girl [player] apart” and “No one is leaving with eyebrows today”). [The Guardian, 10-30-2015]

In October, the student newspaper of Toronto’s Ryerson University reported a mighty scandal that upset the student body: that the school’s executive offices’ rest rooms routinely supply 2-ply toilet paper while most other campus buildings offer only 1-ply. The hard-hitting Ryerson Eyeopener story noted that the universities of Guelph, Ottawa, and Toronto comfort all toilet-users’ bottoms the same. Ryerson officials, defensively, noted that older plumbing in many of their buildings cannot handle 2-ply paper. [Inside Higher Education, 11-2-2015]

Least Competent Criminals

Nicholas Allegretto, 23, was convicted of shoplifting in Cambridge, England, in October (in absentia, because he is still at large). The prosecutor knows Allegretto is his man because, shortly after the February theft, police released a surveillance photo of Allegretto leaving the store with the unpaid-for item, and Allegretto had come to a police station to complain that the suddenly-public picture made him look guilty. In fact, he claimed, he intended to pay for the item but had gotten distracted (and besides, he added, his body language often looks somewhat “dodgy,” anyway). [Cambridge News, 10-1-2015]

Recurring Themes

Lowering the Bar in Zero Tolerance: The six-year-old son of Martha Miele was given an automatic three-day out-of-school suspension at Our Lady of Lourdes in Cincinnati in October after, emulating actions of his favorite “Power Rangers” characters, he pretended to shoot a bow and arrow at another student. Principal Joe Crachiolo was adamant, insisting that he has “no tolerance” for “any” “real, pretend, or imitated violence.” An exasperated Martha Miele confessed she was at a loss about how a six-year-old boy is supposed to block out the concept of a super-hero fighter (and instead imagine, say, a super-hero counselor?). [WLWT-TV (Cincinnati, 11-2-2015]

Cavalcade of Fetishes: (1) Among the approximately 100 arrests Seattle police made in an October drug sting were of a man, 63, and woman, 58, accused only of retail theft of $150,000 worth of goods--including about 400 pairs of jeans. Police said the couple “ordered” items from shoplifters and seemed to have an “insatiable appetite for denim.” (2) In November, police in Bethel, Conn., arrested Nelson Montalvo, 50--accused of taking about 30 items of underwear from one particular home. Montalvo’s motive is being investigated, but police said his modus operandi was to remove items, cut holes in them, and return them to the home. [Associated Press via Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 10-16-2015] [Connecticut Post, 11-5-2015]

A News of the Weird Classic (January 2011)

Name in the News: Sought as a suspect in a convenience store killing in Largo, Fla., in December [2010] (and an example of the highly revealing "Three First Names" theory of criminal liability), Mr. Larry Joe Jerry--who actually has four first names (Larry Joe Jerry, Jr.). (He was convicted in 2013 and sentenced to 42 years in prison.) [St. Petersburg Times, 12-2-2010] [Bay News 9 (St. Petersburg), 7-12-2013]

Thanks This Week to Eric Wainwright, and to the News of the Weird Board Senior Advisors (Jenny T. Beatty, Paul Di Filippo, Ginger Katz, Joe Littrell, Matt Mirapaul, Paul Music, Karl Olson, and Jim Sweeney) and Board of Editorial Advisors (Tom Barker, Paul Blumstein, Harry Farkas, Sam Gaines, Herb Jue, Emory Kimbrough, Scott Langill, Bob McCabe, Steve Miller, Christopher Nalty, Mark Neunder, Sandy Pearlman, Bob Pert, Larry Ellis Reed, Peter Smagorinsky, Rob Snyder, Stephen Taylor, Bruce Townley, and Jerry Whittle).

Posted By: Chuck - Sun Nov 22, 2015 - Comments (5)

Wrong Signature Montblanc

In the mid-1990s, Montblanc began selling a limited-edition pen engraved with the signature of Alexandre Dumas, author of The Three Musketeers — at a price of $750 for a fountain pen or $375 for the ballpoint version. But in 1996 the company admitted it had made a mistake and recalled all the pens. The engraved signature was from the wrong Alexandre Dumas. Not the author of The Three Musketeers, but rather his not-quite-as-famous son, author of "The Lady With the Camellias.'"

The mistake was first noticed by the owner of a pen store in Toronto who was displaying a manuscript in his store that included the signature of the senior Dumas and noticed it didn't match the one on the pen. [More info: Eugene Register-Guard - Oct 6, 1996]

At the time, there was a lot of speculation that the wrong-signature pen would quickly rise in value. But no. Checking on eBay, it seems that both versions of the pen go for about the same price (anywhere from $800 to $2000). Probably because too many of the wrong-signature pens were made to make it a rare item.

There's a discussion of both pens on the Fountain Pen Network.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Nov 22, 2015 - Comments (4)
Category: 1990's, Goofs and Screw-ups

Page 1 of 757 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »
Custom Search

Get WU Posts by Email

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

weird universe thumbnail

Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is best known as the curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He also explores the world of weird science at the Mad Science Museum.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Chuck Shepherd
Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

Contact Us

1900's - 1910's - 1920's - 1930's - 1940's - 1950's - 1960's - 1970's - 1980's - 1990's - 2000's - 2010's - Accidents - Actors - Addictions - Advertising - Africa - Agriculture - AI, Robots and Other Automatons - Air Travel and Airlines - Alcohol - Alex - Aliens - Amateurs and Fans - Ambiguity, Uncertainty and Deliberate Obscurity - Animals - Anniversary - Annoying Things - Anthropology - Anthropomorphism - Appliances - Archaeology - Architecture - Armageddon and Apocalypses - Armed Forces - Art - Asia - Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters - Australia - Authorities and Experts - Avant Garde - Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests - Babies - Babies and Toddlers - Backyard BBQ - Bacon - Bad Habits, Neuroses and Psychoses - Bathrooms - Baths, Showers and Other Cleansing Methods - Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues - Bicycles and Other Human-powered Vehicles - Billboards - Birth Control - Blood - Boats - Body - Body Fluids - Body Modifications - Body Painting - Bodybuilding - Bohemians, Beatniks, Hippies and Slackers - Bombast, Bloviation and Pretentiousness - Books - Boredom - Brain - Brain Damage - Buildings and Other Structures - Bums, Hobos, Tramps, Beggars, Panhandlers and Other Streetpeople - Bus - Business - Busybodies, Snoops and Kibitzers - Butt - Cacophony, Dissonance, White Noise and Other Sonic Assaults - Can't Possibly Be True - Candy - Cannibalism - Caribbean - Cars - Cartoons - Cats - Celebrities - Censorship, Bluenoses, Taboos, Prohibitions and Other Cultural No-No's - Central America - Centuries - Ceremonies - Certificates, Diplomas, and Other Testaments of Achievement - Charities and Philanthropy - Charity - Child Prodigies - Children - Chindogu - Chocolate - Chuck - Civic Duties - Clowns - Clubs, Fraternities and Other Self-selecting Organizations - Coffee and other Legal Stimulants - Collectors - Comedians - Comics - Comments - Communications - Computers - Confusion, Misunderstanding, and Incomprehension - Conspiracy Theories and Theorists - Contest - Contests, Races and Other Competitions - Conventions - Cops - Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings - Corrections - Cosmetics - Costumes and Masks - Couples - Crafts - Crime - Criticism and Reviews - Crossovers and Mashups - Crowds, Groups, Mobs and Other Mass Movements - Cryptozoology - Cult Figures and Artifacts - Culture and Civilization - Curmudgeons and Contrarianism - Curses - Curses, Slurs, Insults, Vituperation, Libel and Slander - Customs - Dance - Daredevils, Stuntpeople and Thrillseekers - Death - Decades - Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination - Design and Designers - Destruction - Detectives, Private Eyes and Other Investigators - Dictators, Tyrants and Other Harsh Rulers - Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical - Dinosaurs and Other Antediluvian Creatures - Dinosaurs and Other Extinct Creatures - Diplomacy and Foreign Relations - Disabilities - Disasters - Disease - Diseases - Disguises, Impersonations, Mimics and Forgeries - Dismemberment - Divorce - Documentaries - Dogs - Domestic - Double Entendres and Nudge-Nudge, Wink-Wink - Dreams and Nightmares - Drugs - Eating - Eccentrics - Education - Eighteenth Century - Elderly - Elderly and Seniors - Emigrants, Immigrants and Borders - Emotions - Engineering and Construction - Enlargements, Miniatures, and Other Matters of Scale - Entertainment - Environmentalism and Ecology - Ethics and Morals - Ethnic Groupings - Etiquette and Formal Behavior - Europe - Evil - Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough - Excrement - Exercise and Fitness - Experiments - Experts and Authority Figures - Exploitation and Grindhouse - Explosives - Eyes and Vision - Face and Facial Expressions - Facial Hair - Fads - Fairs, Amusement Parks, and Resorts - Family - Fantasy - Farming - Fashion - Feet - Feminism - Fetishes - Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack - Fictional Monsters - Fireworks and Pyrotechnics - Fish - Flags - Flatulence - Flight - Food - Foreign Customs - Forteana - Frauds, Cons and Scams - Freaks, Oddities, Quirks of Nature - Freebies, Come-ons and Loss Leaders - Furniture - Futurism - Gambling, Casinos, Lotteries and Other Games of Chance - Games - Garbage, Trash, Waste and Other Detritus - Geeks, Nerds and Pointdexters - Gender - Gender-bending - Genitals - Geography and Maps - Giant People in Ads - Gods - Goofs and Screw-ups - Goths - Government - Graffiti - Graphics - Guess the Scientist - Guns - Hair and Hairstyling - Hair Styling - Headgear - Headlines - Health - Hermits - Highways, Roads, Streets and Traffic - Hillbillies, Country Bumpkins, Ruralism and Flyover Country - Historical Figure - History - Hoaxes and Imposters and Imitators - Hobbies and DIY - Holidays - Hollywood - Homages, Pastiches, Tributes and Borrowings - Horror - Horticulture and Gardens - Hospitals - Hotels - Human Marvels - Humor - Hunting, Trapping and Other Wilderness Activities - Husbands - Hygiene - Imitations, Forgeries, Rip-offs and Faux - India - Industry, Factories and Manufacturing - Inebriation and Intoxicants - Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art - Infantilism - Injuries - Innuendo, Double Entendres, Symbolism, Nudge-Nudge-Wink-Wink and Subliminal Messages - Insects - Insurance - Intelligence - Interior Decorating - Internet - Inventions - Jabberwocky, Scat Singing, Nonsense Verse and Glossolalia - Jewelry - Jobs and Occupations - Johnson Smith Catalog - Jokes - Journalism - Judges - Junk Food - Juvenile Delinquency - Kitsch and Collectibles - Landmarks - Landscaping - Languages - Law - Lawsuits - LGBT - Libraries - Lies, Dishonesty and Cheating - Literature - Little People - Love & Romance - Mad Scientists, Evil Geniuses, Insane Villains - Magazines - Magic and Illusions and Sleight of Hand - Marriage - Martial Arts - Mass Transit - Medicine - Men - Mental Health and Insanity - Middle East - Midwest Divisions Friday Feast - Military - Mining - Misbehavior, Rebellion, Acting-out and General Naughtiness - Mistranslations - Money - Monuments - More Things To Worry About - Motor Vehicles - Motorcycles - Movies - Museums - Music - Myths and Fairytales - Name That List - Native Americans - Natural Resources - Natural Wonders - Nature - Nausea, Revulsion and Disgust - New Age - New Zealand - Newspapers - NGOs - Nineteenth Century - Noises and Other Public Disturbances of the Peace - North America - Not Clear On The Concept - Nudism - Nutrition - Obesity - Obituaries - Obscenity - Obsessions - Oceans and Maritime Pursuits - Odd Names - Officials - Opera - Outrageous Excess - Outsider Art - Overpriced Merchandise - Pain, Self-inflicted and Otherwise - Parades and Festivals - Paradoxes, Enigmas and Other Conundrums - Paranormal - Parents - Parody - Patriotism - Paul - Performance Art - Perfume and Cologne and Other Scents - Perfume and Other Scents - Pests, Plagues and Infestations - Pets - Philosophy - Photography and Photographers - Pirates - Poetry - Police and Other Law Enforcement - Political Correctness - Politics - Pop Art - Pop Culture - Postal Services - Posters - Power Generation - Pranks - Pranks and Revenge - Predictions - Pregnancy - Prisons - Products - Propaganda, Thought Control and Brainwashing - PSA's - Psychedelic - Psychology - Public Humiliation - Public Indecency - Public Utilities - Publicity Stunts - Puppets and Automatons - Quizzes - Racism - Radio - Rants, Warnings, Jeremiads, Prophecies and Cassandra-like Figures - Reader Recommendation - Real Estate - Really Bad Ideas - Recreation - Recurring - Reformers, Do-gooders, Agitators and SJWs - Regionalism - Regulations - Religion - Restaurants - Retail Establishments - Retailing - Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience - Rituals and Superstitions - Robots - Roleplayers and Re-enactors - Romances - Royalty - Rube Goldberg Devices - Russia - Sadness - Scams, Cons, Rip-offs, and General Larceny - Scary Criminals - Scatology - Scholarship - School - Science - Science Fiction - Screams, Grunts and Other Exclamations - Screwups - Seasonal - Self-help Schemes - Seventeenth Century - Sex - Sex Lives Worse Than Yours - Sex Symbols - Sex Toys - Sexuality - Shoes - Shopping - ShowBiz - Sightseeing - Signage - Sixteenth Century - Skin and Skin Conditions - Skulls, Bones and Skeletons - Slang - Slavery, Bondage and Indenture - Sleaze and Sleazeballs - Sleep and Dreams - Smoking and Tobacco - Soda, Pop, Soft Drinks and other Non-Alcoholic Beverages - South America - South Pacific - South Pacific and Polynesia - Space Travel - Space-age Bachelor Pad & Exotic - Spaceflight, Astronautics, and Astronomy - Spies and Intelligence Services - Spies and Secret Agents - Spies and Secret Agents - Sports - Stamps - Statues, Monuments and Memorials - Stereotypes and Cliches - Stomach - Stop-motion Animation - Strange Candidates - Strange Websites - Stupid Criminals - Stupidity - Subcultures - Subways - Success & Failure - Superheroes - Superstition - Surgery - Surrealism - Swears - Swimming, Snorkeling, and Diving - Synchronicity - Synchronicity and Coincidence - Tattoos - Taxidermy - Technology - Teenagers - Teeth - Telephones - Television - Terrorism and Terrorists - Testing and Ranking - Theater and Stage - Time-travel - Tobacco and Smoking - Tools - Torture - Tourists and Tourism - Toys - Tradesmen, Manual Laborers, and Skilled Workers - Tragedy and Pathos - Trains - Trains and Other Vehicles on Rails - Transportation - Travel - Trucks - TV News - Twentieth Century - Twenty-first Century - Twins, Lookalikes & Doppelgangers - Underwear - Universities, Colleges, Private Schools and Academia - Unsolved Mysteries - Urban Life - Utilities - Utilities and Power Generation - Utopias and Dystopias - Vaudeville - Vegetables - Vegetarians and Vegans - Video - Videogames - Videogames and Gamers - Vigilante Justice - Violence - War - Weapons - Weather - Weddings - Weddings and Marriage - Weird Names - Weird Studies and Guides - Weird Theory - Weird Universe - Wild West and US Frontier - Wimps, Milquetoasts and Cowards - Wives - Women - Work and Vocational Training - World - World Records - Wrestling - Writers - Yesterday's Tomorrows - Your Daily Jury Duty - Your Daily Loser

This page has been viewed 27114644 times.