Weird Universe


Car Vending Machine

Thousands of dollars to buy a car, hundreds more to travel to the location, picking up your new car from a vending machine priceless.
Posted By: patty | Date: Sat Nov 14, 2015 | Comments (8)
Category: Buildings and Other Structures, Retailing, Transportation

Problem on Interstate

Story reported by Iowa CBS affiliate KCCI last Friday. [via AdWeek]

Posted By: Alex | Date: Sat Jul 18, 2015 | Comments (3)
Category: Journalism, Transportation

Slow Taxi

Need to get somewhere slow? The Turtle Taxi service, currently operating in Yokohama, promises to drive as slowly as possible. They'll even turn off the engine at red lights. The service is said to be popular with pregnant women, the elderly, and parents with sleeping children. []

Posted By: Alex | Date: Wed Oct 15, 2014 | Comments (10)
Category: Transportation, Asia

Bus artist

Denise Poole is "artist in residence" on the Bournemouth city buses. As she moves around the city, she sketches what she sees. Not a series of sketches, mind you. A day's journey results in one sketch. If it looks like a bunch of squiggly lines on paper to you, then perhaps you're a philistine who can't appreciate art. [BBC News Dorset]

Posted By: Alex | Date: Wed Jan 29, 2014 | Comments (7)
Category: Art, Transportation

Manhattan Super Terminal


If only this gargantuan structure had actually been built! What a different world we would have inhabited....

Original article here.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Tue Jun 04, 2013 | Comments (6)
Category: Engineering and Construction, Urban Life, Utopias and Dystopias, Transportation, 1930's

Make A Cardboard Bicycle for $9

This isn't at the mass production stage yet, but someday soon you may be able to ride your own cardboard bicycle.

Here's a link to the story:

I like the cardboard seat demonstration, but I think I'd rather buy one for $60 than spend the time to make my own.
Posted By: gdanea | Date: Wed Apr 17, 2013 | Comments (2)
Category: Transportation

The Anti-Collision Train

Imagine you're riding in a train, when you see another train hurtling toward you on the same track. No problem. You're on the "anti-collision train," designed by P.K. Stern of New York. It was a bold idea for improving travel safety, but it never caught on. The Strand magazine (1904) explained the concept:

A single track is used, on which railway-cars are caused to travel. Two cars are rushing towards each other at a speed of twenty-five miles an hour, so that a collision would, under ordinary conditions, be inevitable, when suddenly one of the cars runs, not into, but over the top of the other and lands on the track on the other side, where it continues in perfect safety to its destination. The underneath car has proceeded as if nothing had happened.

The cars, although they run upon wheels, are really travelling bridges, with overhanging compartments for the accommodation of passengers. Over the framed structure of the cars thus constituted an arched track is carried, securely fastened to the car and serving the purpose of providing a road-bed for the colliding car. This superimposed track is built in accordance with well-understood principles of bridge construction.

Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Feb 01, 2013 | Comments (9)
Category: Inventions, Travel, Transportation, Trains


Greatest modification ever -- a barbecue installed in a car!!

Now the tailgate party goes wherever the car can go.


Here's the link:

At $156,000, the host of an Australian radio show spent the entire marketing budget on the car.

At the link, you can read the reason driving and barbecuing at the same time aren't recommended.
Posted By: gdanea | Date: Mon Dec 03, 2012 | Comments (3)
Category: Transportation

Human Hamster Wheel

Too drunk to use the escalator?

I don't know how long he thought this set of stairs was, but he was willing to keep trying.
Posted By: gdanea | Date: Wed Nov 14, 2012 | Comments (12)
Category: Transportation
Page 1 of 3 pages  1 2 3 >
Custom Search

weird universe thumbnail

This page has been viewed 36093814 times.
All original content in posts is Copyright © 2008 by the author of the post, either Alex Boese ("Alex"), Paul Di Filippo ("Paul"), or Chuck Shepherd ("Chuck"). All rights reserved. The banner illustration at the top of this page is Copyright © 2008 by Rick Altergott.