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Category:
Cosmetics

Snail Cream

You no longer need to let snails crawl across your face to stay looking young. Because Charmzone is now selling Snail Wrinkle Recover Cream (available from Amazon for $59.99 a jar), which it claims is the first cream formulated with concentrated filtrate of snail mucus. Just smear the snail mucus all over your face and enjoy the glow of youth. [via styleite.com]

Posted By: Alex | Date: Mon Apr 14, 2014 | Comments (11)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Cosmetics

Snail Facial


Oh the horror!
Posted By: patty | Date: Mon Jul 15, 2013 | Comments (6)
Category: Cosmetics

Anime Makeup



Never too early to start thinking about your Halloween look!
Posted By: Paul | Date: Tue Jul 24, 2012 | Comments (3)
Category: Cosmetics, Costumes and Masks, Comics, Asia

The Eyelash is the Window of the Soul

image

Click to enlarge.

Who ever knew that a false eyelash could reveal so much about the wearer?

From McCall's for April 1969.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Sat Jul 30, 2011 | Comments (5)
Category: Body, Cosmetics, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1960's, Women

Weird Science - I Sing The Body Eccentric

President Obama’s recent fall in approval rating may have an unusual cause, he may possibly be too thin. In a recent study by Elizabeth Miller of the University of Missouri, voters prefer their male politicians to be portly, while women representatives should be more wasp-waisted. In an experiment involving 120 volunteers, people were asked to assess fictitious male and female candidates from a brief bio and a picture, crucially two pictures of each candidate were used, a natural one and one manipulated to portray the person as overweight. People shown the heavier male scored him an average 10% higher for reliability, honesty, dependability and inspiration than his thinner doppelganger, but this relationship was reversed in the woman candidate. In the journal Obesity, Miller puts this down to societal expectation and stereotyping (Telegraph).

Social pressure also crops up in explaining another finding this week, this one by Meridith Young of McMaster University in Ontario, that what single women eat depends a lot on whom they are eating with. After covertly monitoring the canteen behaviour of 470 undergraduates, Young found that women significantly lowered their calorie intake when sat with men compared with all women groups. Moreover, the more men a woman sat with, the less on average she consumed. In the journal Appetite, she puts the discrepancy down to women unconsciously advertising themselves to men, adding "the salad leaves are meant to say, I'm pretty, I'm attractive, I take care of myself" (Guardian).

Of course, we all know what men really like in a woman; that she not appear too powerful. Or so says a study by Brian Meier and Sarah Dionne of Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. In the study, eighty 19 year-olds were asked to rate the attractiveness of a number of images presented in random order, some of which would be repeated. In fact the subjects saw each image twice, once near the top of the screen and once low down. The researchers found that men rated women 1.8% more attractive when observed near the bottom, and women found men 1.5% better looking when higher up. They suggest that their findings might explain why men are taller than their women partners more frequently than would be expected by chance (Times of India).

As to what women really like in men, perhaps not being British should be somewhere on the list. After champagne controversially lost out to an English wine earlier this week, French scientists have hit back at British research that concluded that the mythical “G-spot” did not exist. “Of course it exists,” say French gynaecologists, “you just can’t find it!” The original study by King’s College in London looked at over 900 pairs of identical or non-identical twins in the expectation that the identical siblings should both report having a G-spot more frequently than the others, they did not. The French however claim their cross-channel colleagues have got the wrong end of the speculum, “It is not a question of genetics but of use," said one (Telegraph).

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Posted By: Dumbfounded | Date: Wed Feb 03, 2010 | Comments (6)
Category: Babies, Cosmetics, Exercise and Fitness, Politics, Science, Anthropology, Experiments, Psychology, Sexuality, Divorce, Obesity

Life Imitates Art

Here are two commercials to watch. I believe that you will see a startling similarity emerge that will shake you to the core (or maybe just halfway to the core).



So far, so good. It's your basic ad for cosmetics, showing a heavily airbrushed woman who looks somewhat like an android (gynoid?), poncing around in an empty, black, out-of-focus room, interspersed with product shots against a stark white background. (I'm always a little saddened when the real product doesn't create lines of light in contour around my wife's face.) I don't know to much about the product's specific properties.

What I know for sure is that it bares a startling similarity to a fictional product I have seen before.
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Posted By: kingmonkey | Date: Tue May 05, 2009 | Comments (5)
Category: Armageddon and Apocalypses, Body Modifications, Cannibalism, Cosmetics, Movies, Advertising
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All original content in posts is Copyright © 2008 by the author of the post, either Alex Boese ("Alex"), Paul Di Filippo ("Paul"), or Chuck Shepherd ("Chuck"). All rights reserved. The banner illustration at the top of this page is Copyright © 2008 by Rick Altergott.