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Category:
Fashion

The dog-hair yarn business

Back in the 1980s, Betty Burlan Burian Kirk got the idea of starting a business spinning dog-hair yarn. Her clients were people who "want to wear something from their dog." She said it was "becoming more and more popular."


Has the trend of "wearing your pet" continued to grow in popularity since the 80s? Well, here at WU we've posted before about people who wear dog-fur sweaters. So maybe it is a popular thing.

And though Betty Burlan Burian Kirk no longer seems to be in business, a quick google search pulls up plenty of places (such as here) that'll spin your dog's fur into yarn for you, if that's what floats your boat.

Update: So her middle name is "Burian", not "Burlan". And she's still in business. Her website, bbkirk.com, offers plenty of info on dog hair — how to collect it, wash it, pricing, etc. Plus, she has a Gallery of Dog Hair Items.
Posted By: Alex | Date: Sun Nov 02, 2014 | Comments (9)
Category: Fashion, Dogs, 1980's

Belt Scooter

It's a scooter that you can wear as a belt when you're not using it. (Though I wonder how well it functions as either a scooter or a belt.) More info at behance.net.



Posted By: Alex | Date: Sat Nov 01, 2014 | Comments (3)
Category: Bicycles and Other Human-powered Vehicles, Fashion

Energy-harvesting jewelry

Naomi Kizhner's jewelry serves two purposes: 1) it's decorative; 2) it harvests energy from your body to charge your various electronic devices.

For instance, "The Blinker" gets energy from your blinks. The "Blood Bridge" is more invasive, tapping directly into a vein to power a hydro micro turbine.

However, you can't buy this jewelry because it's really just an art project intended to "provoke the thought about how far will we go to in order to 'feed' our addiction in the world of declining resources."

More at Naomi Kizhner's website. [via The Higher Learning]



Posted By: Alex | Date: Mon Oct 27, 2014 | Comments (10)
Category: Fashion, Jewelry, Power Generation

Lapkins

Yet another useless product. Put the napkin on your lap and make it look like you're only wearing underwear. Nudists could use them to make it look like they're wearing underwear! Get 'em here. (via OhGizmo)




Posted By: Alex | Date: Thu Oct 02, 2014 | Comments (11)
Category: Fashion, Underwear, Hygiene

Chubbettes

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Original ad here.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Thu Oct 02, 2014 | Comments (9)
Category: Fashion, Advertising, Children, 1950's, Obesity

Follies of the Madmen #229

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Upskirt photography: one of advertising's less-utilized tools.

Original ad here.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Sat Sep 06, 2014 | Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Fashion, Shoes, Public Indecency, 1960's

Follies of the Madmen #227

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[Click to enlarge]

Yes, our product is number one among insane vegan fashionistas!

From Woman's Day for April 1962.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Mon Aug 18, 2014 | Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Fashion, Vegetables, 1960's

Rude Baby Jumper

Several people who purchased (or were given) a baby jumper sold by the fashion chain Next have complained after they noticed it was "covered in penis drawings." The store admits that, yes, this does appear to be the case, but explains that the original design was "over simplified by the printer and has unintentionally become something else." [NorthDevonJournal.co.uk]
Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Jul 18, 2014 | Comments (14)
Category: Babies, Fashion

Magic Slacks with Removable Crotch

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[Click to enlarge.]

"For personal daintiness."

Original ad here. (Page 51)
Posted By: Paul | Date: Fri Jul 11, 2014 | Comments (10)
Category: Fashion, 1950's, Genitals

Things Happen

The Eleganza fashion catalog for men. Circa 1972.



Posted By: Alex | Date: Sun Jun 29, 2014 | Comments (17)
Category: Fashion, 1970's
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All original content in posts is Copyright © 2008 by the author of the post, either Alex Boese ("Alex"), Paul Di Filippo ("Paul"), or Chuck Shepherd ("Chuck"). All rights reserved. The banner illustration at the top of this page is Copyright © 2008 by Rick Altergott.