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Category:
1930's

Mystery Gadget 22

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Answer is here.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Mon Aug 25, 2014 | Comments (7)
Category: Technology, 1930's

William Skinner’s Gravity Engine





Apparently, some 75 years on, people are still trying to prove the reality of this perpetual motion machine.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Sat Aug 16, 2014 | Comments (7)
Category: Eccentrics, Hoaxes and Imposters and Imitators, Inventions, 1930's

Mathilda the Bottled Hen

Mathilda, a white leghorn chicken, was pushed into a five-gallon glass jug by her owner, Henry Willis, minutes after she emerged from her shell. She then grew into an adult chicken in the bottle, and became known as Mathilda the Bottled Hen of Denver. This was back in 1936.

Willis said he bottled her as part of an experiment to control her diet, though many scientists said they couldn't see any value in such an experiment. Animal rights activists were outraged and pushed the state bureau of child and animal protection to intervene. But ultimately the state authorities didn't do anything because, according to the DA Earl Wettengil, "this appears to be a scientific investigation which justifies the facts."

So as far as I know, Mathilda remained bottled for her entire life.


Putting hens in bottles must have become a bit of a fad, because I found a picture of a second hen bottled a year after Mathilda.


Carroll Daily Herald (Carroll, Iowa) - Mar 7, 1936.
Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Aug 08, 2014 | Comments (8)
Category: Animals, 1930's

Husband For Sale

1935: Mary Ann and Fred Cordes weren't doing too well with their marriage. But instead of just getting a divorce, like normal people, they (well, it was mostly Mary Ann's idea) hatched a plan to sell Fred for $1500 to any woman willing to buy him. Mary Ann hoped to use the money to travel to Ireland, her childhood home.

I don't know how their plan turned out. It's one of those stories that never got a follow-up in the press. But I can't imagine women were lining up to pay $1500 to acquire "all the rights" to a 40-year-old unemployed ice-cream maker.


Time - Aug 26, 1935


The Brooklyn Daily Eagle - Aug 14, 1935
Posted By: Alex | Date: Wed Aug 06, 2014 | Comments (14)
Category: Divorce, Marriage, 1930's

Andrew “Bossy” Gillis, Two-Fisted Mayor of Newburyport

As intermittent mayor, he ran Newburyport, MA, from his gas station, and when out of office was not averse to punching the current mayor in the face.

There's a good summary of his antics here.

The kind of authentic politician so lacking today. The article from 1937 below gives some of his flavor.

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Posted By: Paul | Date: Mon Aug 04, 2014 | Comments (6)
Category: Politics, Curmudgeons and Contrarianism, 1920's, 1930's

Follies of the Madmen #225



Who ever knew that Snap, Crackle & Pop had villainous counterparts in Soggy, Mushy & Toughy?
Posted By: Paul | Date: Sat Jul 26, 2014 | Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, 1930's

Knox Gelatine

Odd choice of photo to advertise their product, since this Big Red team member seems to be suffering from some kind of intestinal distress. From the Cornell Alumni News - Oct 19, 1939

Posted By: Alex | Date: Mon Jul 07, 2014 | Comments (6)
Category: Advertising, 1930's

The Nicotine Fairies



Unless he was smoking something else.....

How much paint?

This story ran in the Washington Post on June 26, 1933. It describes how a dispute over how many coats of paint is required to paint a car resulted in tragedy.

But it leaves unanswered the question of how much paint is needed to paint a car. My hunch would be that paint is better nowadays than it was in 1933, so fewer coats are needed. But I'd say it has to be three coats minimum (including the primer). Nine coats (even back in 1933) sounds like too much.

Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Jun 27, 2014 | Comments (10)
Category: 1930's, Cars
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