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Category:
1930's

Wrong-Way Corrigan







Always a pleasure to revisit this famous incident and charming fellow, with some "new" vintage footage of him at a press conference.

Posted By: Paul | Date: Fri Dec 12, 2014 | Comments (3)
Category: Eccentrics, Air Travel and Airlines, 1930's

Unrequited Love

I assume this pick-up technique didn't work for Saturnius Villaflor.


Source: The Cuba Patriot - Nov 28, 1935
Posted By: Alex | Date: Sat Dec 06, 2014 | Comments (1)
Category: 1930's, Love & Romance

Kangaroo Boxing



Why has this noble sport of kings been discontinued?
Posted By: Paul | Date: Fri Dec 05, 2014 | Comments (7)
Category: Animals, Sports, 1930's, Australia

Marital Bliss


Source: The Coshocton Tribune - Mar 20, 1937
Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Dec 05, 2014 | Comments (4)
Category: Husbands, Wives, Marriage, 1930's

The Gray Shadow

"Lift the gloom of gray that darkens your face!"


Source: The Raritan Township and Fords Beacon - Apr 10, 1936
Posted By: Alex | Date: Wed Nov 26, 2014 | Comments (5)
Category: Advertising, 1930's, Hair and Hairstyling

Norris Kellam, the Human Cork

Norris Kellam's great talent in life was floating. For which he earned the name "The Human Cork." In May 1933 he attempted to break the world record for staying afloat by floating in a saltwater pool in Norfolk, Virginia for over 86 hours. Unfortunately he didn't make it. After 71 hours and 19 minutes he was overcome by sharp cramps and sunburn and had to climb out of the pool.

There's more about Kellam at hamptonroads.com. The images are from the Norfolk Public Library.



Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Oct 17, 2014 | Comments (7)
Category: Human Marvels, Sports, World Records, 1930's

The Art of the Diseuse









Not sure these recorded performances capture whatever unique brilliance these performers were reputed to exhibit.

In the December 21, 1935 edition of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette an entertainment columnist wrote: “The English language does not contain a word which perfectly describes the performance of Ruth Draper, who comes to the Nixon next Thursday for the first time in several years to give a different program at each of her four performances here. “Speaking Portraits” and “Character Sketches” are the two terms most frequently applied to Miss Draper's work; and yet it is something more than that. “Diseuse” is the French word, but that is more readily applicable to an artist like Yvette Guilbert or Raquel Meller. Monologist is wholly inadequate. The word “Diseuse” really means “an artist in talking” so that may be the real term to use in connection with Miss Draper.” Actresses who have been called noted diseuses over the years include Yvette Guilbert, Ruth Draper, Joyce Grenfell, Cornelia Otis Skinner, Lucienne Boyer, Raquel Meller, Odette Dulac, Beatrice Herford, Kitty Cheatham, Marie Dubas, Claire Waldoff, Lina Cavalieri, Françoise Rosay, Molly Picon, Corinna Mura, Lotte Lenya.


Source of quote.

Posted By: Paul | Date: Mon Sep 29, 2014 | Comments (5)
Category: Performance Art, 1930's, 1960's

Chevrolet Leader News



Calling this "news" is highly generous.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Wed Sep 24, 2014 | Comments (4)
Category: Advertising, 1930's, Cars

Corn Husking Championship





I can hardly wait to see who wins this year.



Posted By: Paul | Date: Sat Sep 13, 2014 | Comments (5)
Category: Agriculture, Boredom, Contests, Races and Other Competitions, 1930's

No more low flying!

This is what the airlines did for in-flight entertainment, back in the day. From the Los Angeles Times, Sep 8, 1935:

Posted By: Alex | Date: Tue Sep 02, 2014 | Comments (4)
Category: Air Travel and Airlines, 1930's
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All original content in posts is Copyright © 2008 by the author of the post, either Alex Boese ("Alex"), Paul Di Filippo ("Paul"), or Chuck Shepherd ("Chuck"). All rights reserved. The banner illustration at the top of this page is Copyright © 2008 by Rick Altergott.