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Category:
1970's

Marty the Marijuana Mouse

Marty the Mouse became famous in 1974 after he made a home for himself in a box of marijuana stored in the evidence room of the San Jose, CA police station. Police were only able to lure him out by baiting a trap with marijuana seeds. (He ignored bacon, peanut butter, cheese, and a female mouse called Mata Hairy.) He became known as Marty the Marijuana Mouse.

But instead of killing him, he was first sent to UCLA to aid in studies of marijuana. Then he was returned to San Jose where he became a police mascot. When he died in Nov 1975, the nation mourned.



Posted By: Alex | Date: Sun Sep 28, 2014 | Comments (6)
Category: Animals, 1970's

Maximum Cognitive Dissonance

Posted By: Paul | Date: Sun Sep 28, 2014 | Comments (3)
Category: Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack, Music, 1970's

Vincent Price and the Occult

image

Why don't the occult masters ever reveal anything useful, like winning lottery numbers?

Source is here.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Fri Sep 26, 2014 | Comments (5)
Category: Death, Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination, Superstition, 1970's

Home heating with beer cans

Back in the late 1970s, Bill Tolle of Woodlawn, Ohio figured out a way to use empty beer cans to heat his home in the winter. Basically he made a solar heater, with the empty cans trapping the sun's heat. But the beer can angle perked the media's interest.

Posted By: Alex | Date: Fri Aug 22, 2014 | Comments (9)
Category: Engineering and Construction, Inventions, 1970's

Skinny Liberation

Skinny people aren't often recognized as being part of an oppressed minority. Back in 1972, Barry Goldsmith tried to change this by announcing the Skinny Liberation movement and issuing an "emaciation proclamation." But his efforts don't seem to have changed public attitudes significantly. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find a picture of Mr. Goldsmith. But it sounds like he was definitely quite skinny. Source: The Deseret News - Aug 4, 1972.

Posted By: Alex | Date: Tue Aug 19, 2014 | Comments (6)
Category: 1970's

Trisha Brown in “Accumulation”



It's not much of a dance, but Trisha Brown could certainly have had a career as a sign-language interpreter in South Africa.

Oh, yes, recipient of MacArthur "genius grant."

Morph, the UK Gumby



I never knew before about Morph, the forerunner of Wallace & Gromit. On first glance, he seems less weird and manic than either Gumby or W&G.
Posted By: Paul | Date: Thu Aug 07, 2014 | Comments (4)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Stop-motion Animation, 1970's, Europe

Latin Valediction

Back in 1978, Lidia Mostovy was chosen to deliver the valedictory address at the 99th commencement of Frank H. Morrell High School, so she decided to give it in Latin. Her speech began: "Olim Alexander Magnus dixit: 'Meis parentibus vitam debeo, meis magistris, vitam bonam.'"

She explained that she "wanted to add dignity to the graduation exercises and... draw attention to the high school's Latin program. 'A lot of people ask why take Latin — you're not going to use it. So now I will.'"

Source: The Ukrainian Weekly - June 25, 1978 (page 11).

Since I took Latin throughout high school, and even participated in our high school's Latin play, I'm sympathetic to what she did. And I guess it probably wasn't any more or less boring than any other high school valediction, just because no one could understand it.


Posted By: Alex | Date: Tue Aug 05, 2014 | Comments (12)
Category: Education, Languages, 1970's

Suicide Payoff

If you jump in front of a train, is it the train driver's fault if he doesn't stop in time to run you over? Maybe. Back in 1977, Milo Stephens tried to commit suicide in this way and later sued the New York City Transit Authority for running him over. The TA gave him a settlement payment of $650,000 rather than going to trial.

A Time magazine article (Jan 9, 1984) explains why the TA opted for the settlement rather than fighting it:

The new rules, known as comparative negligence, allow a jury to assess the percentage of fault on each side and apportion damages accordingly. This is what worried Richard Bernard, general counsel for the Transit Authority. Stephens' injuries, based on other recent jury awards, "would have justified a verdict of, say, $3.5 million," observes Bernard. If the jury then found that Stephens was only 75% responsible for the accident, the Transit Authority might have been liable for $875,000, plus the cost of going to trial, thus making a $650,000 settlement 'favorable from our point of view.'

Posted By: Alex | Date: Mon Aug 04, 2014 | Comments (11)
Category: Lawsuits, 1970's
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All original content in posts is Copyright © 2008 by the author of the post, either Alex Boese ("Alex"), Paul Di Filippo ("Paul"), or Chuck Shepherd ("Chuck"). All rights reserved. The banner illustration at the top of this page is Copyright © 2008 by Rick Altergott.