Category:
1930s

Obscene Chinese Money

The portrait of Confucius is expressing his opinion with his fingers of the occupying Japanese army.




Posted By: Paul - Wed Mar 16, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Innuendo, Double Entendres, Symbolism, Nudge-Nudge-Wink-Wink and Subliminal Messages, Money, War, 1930s, Asia

Suicide with sock

This sounds like a particularly unpleasant way to end one's life.

Dayton Daily News - Mar 25, 1932

Posted By: Alex - Sat Mar 12, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Suicide, 1930s

A Device for Intercepting the Moisture running down the Hands and Wrists when Eating Crayfish

In 1933, the British patent office awarded Edgar Honig of Germany Patent No. 393,673 for this invention. From his patent:

This invention relates to a means for intercepting the liquid tending to run down the wrists and the arms when eating crayfish.

When eating crustacea of this nature, it is found very unpleasant that the liquid emerging therefrom tends to run down the wrists and into the sleeves, this liquid resulting in stains, which it is extremely difficult or impossible to remove.

According to the invention, this drawback is overcome by means of a ring which tightly encircles the wrist and consists of an absorbent material. As a material of this description it is convenient to employ rubber sponge. It is, however, also possible to use paper, fabric or similar materials, which intercept the moisture running over the wrists and absord the same.

I'm not a fan of shellfish, so I wasn't aware how messy crayfish (aka crawfish) could be. But evidently their messiness really bothered Honig.





Below: how to eat crawfish.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Mar 10, 2022 - Comments (3)
Category: Food, Patents, 1930s

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 42

This series has suddenly become topical!



Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 24, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Dogs, 1930s, 1940s

Jealous Judy Prefers Gentlemen

Reno Gazette Journal - May 12, 1937

Posted By: Alex - Thu Feb 17, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Love and Romance, 1930s, Men

Mystery Gadget 100

What's happening with these poor doggos?

The answer is here.

Or after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Feb 11, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Science, Dogs, 1930s

Ice-Block Skiing

It's like water-skiing, but on blocks of ice towed through city streets.

Wipeouts would be a lot more painful.

Info from the LA Public Library:

These three photographs show women in swimsuits near the streets of Venice Beach riding on blocks of ice. In the frame at [top], three women are sitting on a huge block of ice and are being towed by cars. The frame at [middle] shows three women sitting together on an ice block in siwmsuits and heels, holding on to a rope. In the third frame at bottom, three women are "ice-block" skiing, and waving to the camera. Appears to be a publicity photograph for the Miss California Bathing Beauty Contest.

I'm guessing the year was 1936, since the other images of the 'Miss California Bathing Beauty Contest' at the library are from that year.





Posted By: Alex - Thu Feb 10, 2022 - Comments (3)
Category: Sports, 1930s

Ellen Harkonen, Potato Queen of 1936

Source: Keansburg News (Keansburg, New Jersey) 31 Dec 1936, Thu Page 4

Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 10, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Agriculture, Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Food, 1930s

NRA Day Parades

The current era has been compared to the Depression and New Deal under Roosevelt. But what's lacking today as we seek to emerge from the pandemic malaise is--parades!

To celebrate "NRA Day," New York City threw a parade that utilized a quarter of a million participants.





But it wasn't just NYC. Smaller places joined in too. Such as Dothan, Alabama. Visit this page for the full account, with lots of great photos.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Feb 08, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Government, Money, Parades and Festivals, 1930s

45 Jobs in 45 States

In January 1939, Lyra Ferguson of Missouri left her job as a church secretary and took off on a tour of the United States. Her goal was to spend a week working in all 48 states. Alaska and Hawaii weren't yet states, so she didn't have to worry about those. She was equipped with only "a new automobile, a small wardrobe, a little pistol and $200." I'm not sure of her exact age, but news reports said she was "over 40."

She made advance plans to secure a job in a handful of states, but mostly she just arrived and tried to find employment. She also tried to find jobs in industries that seemed representative of each state.

Ultimately she managed to find one-week jobs in 45 states but failed to get work in New York, Nevada, or Arizona.

Her plan had been to write a book about her adventures, but in a later interview she said her attempt at a book was "terrible." So that plan fell through.

However, she did take film footage of her entire journey and later edited this together into a movie which she showed to various groups. Unfortunately I can't find any evidence that this movie still exists.

Below is a list of her jobs in 42 states. I couldn't find any info about her jobs in Arkansas, Colorado, or West Virginia.

  • Alabama: performed at the assembly exercises of the Tuskegee Institute
  • California: worked for an overall company at the San Francisco fair
  • Connecticut: typewriter factory
  • Delaware: tanned kid skins in a tannery
  • Florida: packed oranges
  • Georgia: cafeteria
  • Idaho: dug potatoes
  • Illinois: made wax fruits and flowers
  • Indiana: manufactured refrigerators
  • Iowa: pen factory
  • Kansas: packed dog food
  • Kentucky: ironed shirts in a laundromat
  • Louisiana: packed shrimp
  • Maine: helped out in a lighthouse
  • Maryland: tea packing factory
  • Massachusetts: served as attendant in an insane asylum
  • Michigan: maid on a Great Lakes steamer during tulip festival
  • Minnesota: sewed buttons on suits
  • Mississippi: shucked oysters
  • Missouri: social hostess at a hotel
  • Montana: cooked on a dude ranch
  • Nebraska: booked well-known artists for an agency
  • New Hampshire: paper factory
  • New Jersey: cosmetics factory
  • New Mexico: sewed labels on ties made by Native Americans
  • North Carolina: weaved homespun suiting
  • North Dakota: picked chickens
  • Ohio: worked in the printing room of a newspaper
  • Oklahoma: wiped windshields at a gas station
  • Oregon: packed salmon
  • Pennsylvania: made chocolate candy at Hersheys
  • Rhode Island: baking powder factory
  • South Carolina: textile industry
  • South Dakota: took pictures of the Black Hills for the association of commerce
  • Tennessee: washed turnip greens
  • Texas: delivered packages during the Christmas holidays
  • Utah: wove blankets in a woolen mill
  • Vermont: helped make maple syrup
  • Virginia: weighed peanuts
  • Washington: worked at a general store in a logging camp
  • Wisconsin: milked cows for a dairy
  • Wyoming: worked at Yellowstone

Pittsburgh Press - Dec 24, 1939



Weekly Kansas City Star - May 8, 1940



Sedalia Democrat - Sep 23, 1941



The only follow-up info I can find about her was that in 1956 she had just returned home from a world tour during which she collected souvenirs from the countries she visited. She obviously really liked to travel!

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jan 23, 2022 - Comments (9)
Category: Jobs and Occupations, Travel, Tourists and Tourism, 1930s

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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