Category:
1940s

The Mailomat

Very handy for Xmas rush!

Article source: Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California)10 Dec 1939, Sun Page 59

Another good article here, with more pics.






Posted By: Paul - Fri Dec 24, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Inventions, Technology, 1930s, 1940s, Postal Services

Mystery Gadget 98

What function is the large and complicated box performing?

Answer is here.

Or after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 23, 2021 - Comments (6)
Category: Technology, 1940s

Follies of the Madmen #522



Posted By: Paul - Thu Dec 16, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Body, Hygiene, Advertising, Surrealism, 1940s

Perfume Set to Music



What better way to start the week than with a short six-song album of exotica with a most unlikely title?

Posted By: Paul - Mon Nov 29, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Space-age Bachelor Pad & Exotic, 1940s

Webs In The Wind

Webs in the Wind, published in 1949, is an odd, obscure book. The author, Winifred Duncan, decided that she wanted to learn more about spiders — creatures about which she previously had almost no knowledge.

To do so, she caught spiders outside, released them in her house, and then patiently observed their behavior as they went about building webs in her curtains, between pieces of furniture, behind her toilet, etc. Her book is full of illustrations of the spider webs throughout her house.

Only after observing the spiders for months did she start reading any of the existing scientific literature about spiders.

Used copies of her book are quite expensive, starting at around $35. But you can read the entire book for free at the Hathitrust archive.







Posted By: Alex - Sun Nov 28, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Insects and Spiders, Books, 1940s

Wally Cox:  Early Standup Act



A weird lateral beginning to what his career would become.

Wally Cox (b.1924 d.1973) He started in nightclubs in 1948 doing this act; Monologs done in a heavy NYC accent followed by a song done in a high breaking voice. He was on early TV as Mr. Peepers school principle 1952-1955. A main stay of TV & movies throughout the 60s. He was the voice of Underdog cartoon and one of the Hollywood Squares game show. And a life long friend of Marlon Brando.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 04, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Humor, 1940s

Miss Chicken of Tomorrow

Two "Chicken of Tomorrow" contests were held. The first in 1948, and the second in 1951. Their purpose was to encourage farmers to breed meatier chickens. And they apparently succeeded. Modern Farmer magazine reports that, "Some of the champions of these competitions became the major genetics suppliers of today's poultry."

Of course, at the time one couldn't hold such a major competition without simultaneously holding a beauty contest to find a young woman to be its queen. So, Nancy Magee became the first "Chicken of Tomorrow Queen" and Joan Walters was the second. Joan got quite a bit more publicity. She was paraded around the country as "Miss Chicken of Tomorrow."

For more info, check out this old documentary on YouTube about the 1948 contest.

Nancy Magee, the 1948 Chicken of Tomorrow Queen



"Miss Joan Walters of Rogers, Ark., 18-year-old brunette beauty, was crowned Chicken-of-Tomorrow Queen here last Friday night in a ceremony at the University of Arkansas field house."--The Madison County Record - Apr 12, 1951



"Miss Joan Walters of Rogers, Ark., was recently named National Chicken-of-Tomorrow Queen." Image source: Arkansas Land and Life - Spring/Summer 2004



San Bernardino County Sun - Apr 8, 1951



Orlando Evening Star - May 25, 1951

Posted By: Alex - Tue Nov 02, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Farming, 1940s, 1950s

Atomic Chess

Atomic Chess is a variant of chess that was invented by Nasouhi Bey Tahir, the Transjordanian Deputy Minister of Agriculture, in 1949. Most of its rules were the same as the traditional game except that it was played on a larger board (of 144 squares) and when a pawn was promoted it would become an 'atomic bomb'. When used it would annihilate all pieces (of both players) within a radius of six squares from the object of attack.

The game also involved two other pieces, a tank and airplane, but I'm not sure how these were used.

Sydney Morning Herald - May 1, 1949



Chess.com describes a different version of Atomic Chess, that it says was introduced in 2000. This newer variant is played on a standard board, with the twist that "whenever a piece is captured, an 'explosion' reaching all the squares immediately surrounding the captured piece occurs. This explosion kills all of the pieces in its range except for pawns." Therefore, every capture, except by a pawn, is suicidal.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Oct 22, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Games, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1940s

Who Put the Benzedrine in Mrs Murphy’s Ovaltine?

Hit song of the 1940s. Explanation from YouTube:

Harry (the Hipster) Gibson blends jive & barrelhouse as he pounds out his boogie woogie like Jerry Lee Lewis pounding out rock n roll. A hipster poet precursor to the Beats & even the hippies, his daring lyrics occasionally got him into trouble. "Who Put The Benzedrine In Mrs. Murphy's Ovaltine?" is an updating of an old Irish folk song "Who Put The Overalls In Mrs. Murphy's Chowder?" that ended up getting Harry "The Hipster" Gibson blacklisted from radio play, and put his career on a downward slope it wouldn't recover from until the seventies.




Petoskey News Review - Dec 8, 1947



The folk song it was parodying:

Posted By: Alex - Sun Oct 17, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Drugs, Music, 1940s

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 39





The artist's Wikipedia page.


The Images of Modern Evil series, painted between 1943 and 1948, offers a probing and powerful insight into the schismatic socio-political climate of World War II and its aftermath. Though neither critically nor popularly successful at the time, the series proved formative in Tucker’s practice as a distillation of humanist, psychological and mythological ideas and as a vehicle for specific motifs and narratives that have endured within his art.


Posted By: Paul - Fri Oct 15, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Evil, 1940s

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