Category:
1940s

Weekend in Havana

Can you sing as fast as Carmen Miranda does in this tune, "Rebola a Bola," from WEEKEND IN HAVANA?

I found the Portuguese lyrics and had Google translate them. The eccentric result is to be found after the jump: original line in Portuguese followed by English "translation."





More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Sat Feb 21, 2009 - Comments (7)
Category: Fashion, Human Marvels, Movies, Music, 1940s, South America

Bad Luck Blackie

We all know that cartoon genius Tex Avery was an utter madman in his animation. But BAD LUCK BLACKIE strikes me as the most bizzare and surreal example of his art that I've ever seen.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Feb 20, 2009 - Comments (17)
Category: Pop Art, Surrealism, Cartoons, Cats, Dogs, 1940s

Follies of the Mad Men #56

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[Upper image from Look magazine for June 20 1961. Lower image from Look magazine for April 24 1962.]

A special "two-fer" installment of the Follies thread. Two splendid representations of our friends, the Native Americans, from within the lifetimes of many WU readers.

They hate cheap cigars, but are experts in premium house paints.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 16, 2009 - Comments (13)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1940s, Native Americans

Cobra Woman

I saw Maria Montez's COBRA WOMAN about a year ago. But I had to buy an all-regions DVD player and order the DVD from England, since it's unavailable here. But the expense was worth it, as I think you'll agree after you watch the trailer.



Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 16, 2009 - Comments (8)
Category: Animals, Magic and Illusions and Sleight of Hand, Movies, Pop Culture, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1940s

Young Man Standing on His Head

From the Feb. 9, 1948 issue of Life magazine:

Young Man Stands on Head Before 48 State Capitols
For years sensitive citizens have loudly deplored the antique ugliness of the country's older state capitols. Now a hardheaded young Chicagoan named John G. Nichols, who appears upside down all over these two pages, has discarded words for drastic action. To illustrate his monumental distaste for the architecture of most state capitols he has managed to have his picture taken standing on his head before all 48 of them... He stood on his head in rain, snow, slush and mud and often had a terrible time getting people to take his picture. "They thought I was crazy," he explains modestly.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 06, 2009 - Comments (16)
Category: Architecture, 1940s

The Flying Serpent

You have never experienced the wonders of the cinema until you have seen Vampire Quetzalcoatl in THE FLYING SERPENT. Thanks goodness our radio-star mystery writer is on hand to solve the crime--after allowing several pals to die needlessly in what can only be a bid to boost his show's ratings.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Feb 04, 2009 - Comments (6)
Category: Movies, 1940s, Fictional Monsters

The Red Flannel Festival

In 2009, all WU readers are commanded to attend Michigan's Red Flannel Festival, where natives parade in public in their longjohns.

Here's the history of the tradition, taken from the Festival's homepage.

It all began in 1936 in the midst of "the worst winter in years." The whole country suffered in the grip of heavy snow and sub-zero temperatures. A New York feature writer bemoaned the "fact" that, "Here we are in the midst of an old- fashioned winter and there are no red flannels in the USA to go with it."

The local newspaper, The Cedar Springs Clipper, owned and edited by "The Clipper Gals" Nina Babcock and Grace Hamilton answered the writer with a RED HOT editorial stating: "Just because Sak's Fifth Avenue does not carry red flannels, it doesn't follow that no one in the country does. CEDAR SPRINGS' merchants have red flannels!"

The story was picked up by The Associated Press and orders began pouring in from all over the USA.

Seeing the possibility of at least a few years of publicity because of our famous “drop seaters" and lumbering history, a "RED FLANNEL DAY" was planned for the fall of 1939. After the closure of the Red Flannel Factory in 1994, the citizens became concerned as to the fate of their beloved Red Flannels and of the Red Flannel Festival. However, due to the love of their community legacy, volunteers rallied to keep the Red Flannel Festival tradition alive. It has continued to be an annual event, held the last weekend in September and the first weekend in October. The production of Red Flannel garments was reestablished and they are available to purchase in Cedar Springs.


And here are some shots from early on, courtesy of the Life Photo Archive

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Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 02, 2009 - Comments (9)
Category: Customs, Holidays, Parades and Festivals, Regionalism, Fetishes, Underwear, 1940s

The Ape Man

Bela Lugosi's 1943 film THE APE MAN is truly stupefying in its inane plot and lack of action. But it's only an hour long, and after a while, it exerts a hypnotic attraction.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 02, 2009 - Comments (6)
Category: Movies, 1940s, Fictional Monsters

The Korn Kobblers

Once upon a time, this was considered amusing.
[The second video comes courtesy of Deborah Newton.]



Posted By: Paul - Sat Jan 31, 2009 - Comments (8)
Category: Humor, Music, Regionalism, Reader Recommendation, 1930s, 1940s

Follies of the Mad Men #52

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[From Life magazine for March 27 1944. Two scans, top and bottom.]

Yes, natural resources will never run out, power will be "too cheap to meter," the utilities love you, and winged cherubs will attend milady's bath.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jan 17, 2009 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Utilities, Domestic, 1940s, Natural Resources

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

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