Category:
Architecture

Inventions of Buckminster Fuller, Part 2: The Dymaxion House

Problem: Quality housing is too expensive for the average person.
Answer: The Dymaxion House!
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Posted By: fyshstyxx - Tue May 19, 2009 - Comments (8)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Futurism

Weird Florida, part 1: Carrabelle

Carrabelle is a small town about 20 miles from Apalachicola. It is also home to the world's smallest police station
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Posted By: fyshstyxx - Mon May 18, 2009 - Comments (7)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Communications, Cops, Sightseeing

Murals That Move

Murals are usually large works of art or paintings used to hide an unsightly wall. But Artist Rufus B. Seder has taken murals to the next level. His Lifetile murals are "movies for a wall". Lifetiles don't use electricity, moving parts or tricky lighting. They are optical illusions, with flair. You can read more about Lifetiles, but I recommend watching the video.

Posted By: Nethie - Fri May 15, 2009 - Comments (4)
Category: Architecture, Art, Inventions

Buy Your Own Piece of Armageddon

Be the envy of every other survivalist and have your own converted cold-war Atlas-F missile silo home! You too can live in complete cold war safety and luxury. The converted missile launch site is marketed as a getaway, luxury home, and in my opinion is every survivalist’s dream. The property includes its own private runway, 2000 square foot luxury home above ground with master suite, a private airstrip, and a hangar/garage. Below ground, past the 2000 lb. blast doors and three feet of reinforced concrete built to withstand brutal missile assaults lies two additional stories of space in the converted control room where you will find two additional suites with luxury marble Jacuzzi baths and an escape hatch to your private hangar.

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Posted By: chris_cantwell - Wed May 06, 2009 - Comments (5)
Category: Architecture, Armageddon and Apocalypses, Buildings and Other Structures, Destruction, Flight, Government, Military, Real Estate, Science, War, 1950s

Lloyd Brown’s Globe Theater

Apparently this theater was never constructed, but it's an interesting idea. Though anyone with a fear of heights would want to avoid the ceiling seats. From the Chicago Tribune, May 26, 1901:

A Globe Theater Which is Really a Globe
Many theaters have been called "The Globe," which name, as describing their shape, is a misnomer, but a Kansas City man has planned the real thing in a globe theater, for the interior is spherical. The great advantage which this ingenious man, Lloyd Brown, asserts for this theater is not only that the stage will be visible from all seats, but what is said on the stage may be heard equally well in all parts of the house. The acoustic properties of a theater are as important as the stage properties and are harder to obtain. Frequently persons sitting back under gallery or balcony are unable to hear the players.

The seats in this "globe" theater will begin at the stage, which will occupy the usual place, and rise gradually, going backward on the interior of the sphere until the highest point is reached. There will be only two rows of seats all around, and the upper hanging ones will be suspended on steel beams.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Apr 17, 2009 - Comments (10)
Category: Architecture

Young Man Standing on His Head

From the Feb. 9, 1948 issue of Life magazine:

Young Man Stands on Head Before 48 State Capitols
For years sensitive citizens have loudly deplored the antique ugliness of the country's older state capitols. Now a hardheaded young Chicagoan named John G. Nichols, who appears upside down all over these two pages, has discarded words for drastic action. To illustrate his monumental distaste for the architecture of most state capitols he has managed to have his picture taken standing on his head before all 48 of them... He stood on his head in rain, snow, slush and mud and often had a terrible time getting people to take his picture. "They thought I was crazy," he explains modestly.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 06, 2009 - Comments (16)
Category: Architecture, 1940s

CasAnus

The CasAnus was designed by the Dutch artist Joep van Lieshout. He writes:

This house takes its shape from the human digestive system. While CasAnus is anatomically correct, the last part has been inflated to humongous size. CasAnus is made to function as a hotel, including a bed and a bathroom.

If you stayed there, you could say "This place is crap," and not necessarily mean it in a pejorative sense.

Also by van Lieshout, along similar lines, is the BarRectum (aka Asshole Bar):

The bar takes its shape from the human digestive system: starting with the tongue, continuing to the stomach, moving through the small and the large intestines and exiting through the anus. While BarRectum is anatomically correct, the last part of the large intestine has been inflated to a humongous size to hold as many drinking customers at the bar as possible. The anus itself is part of a large door that doubles as an emergency exit.

via corporeality.net

Posted By: Alex - Wed Dec 03, 2008 - Comments (8)
Category: Architecture, Art, Buildings and Other Structures, Scatology, Excrement, Hotels

Butlin’s Crazy House


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Old amusement park attractions are inevitably weird.

Consider the Crazy House once to be found in Felixstowe, UK.

These old postcard images come from the Flickr set of a fellow who uses the handle Photoaf.

The house was part of a Butlin's Amusement Park. For the history of the founder, Billy Butlin, eventually knighted for his recreational achievements, visit here.

Wouldn't you have loved to experience this park during its heyday, some seventy years ago?

Posted By: Paul - Tue Nov 25, 2008 - Comments (4)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Entertainment, Fairs, Amusement Parks, and Resorts, History, Photography and Photographers, Surrealism, Foreign Customs, 1930s

The Upside-Down House

A businessman has built an upside-down house in Trassenheide, Germany. He says that it's meant to be "an experiment for the senses." Not only is the house upside-down, but so is everything in it. You enter the house through the attic and ascend to the ground floor. I assume the plumbing fixtures are just for show and don't actually work.

Pics can be found here, here, and here.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Sep 03, 2008 - Comments (1)
Category: Architecture

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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