Category:
Food

Cereality

Cereality claims to be "an idea whose time has come." It's a cereal bar:

customers choose from their favorite brands and toppings. Pajama-clad Cereologists™ fill the orders. And customers choose and add their own milk, just the way they like it.

I'm sure there must be people who think this is a great idea, but I'm not one of them. I can't imagine ever wanting to make a special trip to get a bowl of cereal. But then, I'm not a cereal fan. Every morning it's oatmeal for me.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Dec 17, 2008 - Comments (5)
Category: Food, Restaurants

Eating Glass

The new Google magazine archive is a goldmine for weirdness. Here's another find from Popular Science, Nov 1931:

EATS GLASS AND STRING TO AID STOMACH STUDY
Glass beads, strands of knotted thread, and even tiny pellets of gold is the diet of Frederick Hoelzel, Chicago, Ill., university student, since he offered to aid physiologists of the University of Chicago in research work on indigestion. The foreign objects are mixed with his meals, and his stomachaches come under laboratory scrutiny. They are no novelty to the subject of this unusual experiment; he volunteered for the tests because he already suffered from severe digestive troubles.

The full results of Hoelzel's glass-eating study were published in the American Journal of Physiology, (Mar 1, 1930), "The Rate of Passage of Inert Materials Through the Digestive Tract." The article includes a helpful chart, detailing exactly how long it took for various substances (including steel ball-bearings and bent silver wire) to pass through Hoelzel's system:



Hoelzel was an interesting character. He became an expert on nutrition and often subjected himself to grueling diet experiments -- particularly experiments involving fasting for extended periods of time. The Life photo archive has a picture of him, taken in 1955. He seems to have been one of the first researchers to make a link between calorie-restriction and longevity, though it didn't really work for him. He died in 1963 at the age of 73.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Dec 12, 2008 - Comments (8)
Category: Food, Nutrition, Science, Experiments

Sweet Dreams

See three more videos by Kirsten Lepore here.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Dec 07, 2008 - Comments (3)
Category: Art, Surrealism, Food, Nutrition, Sexuality, Video, Cartoons

Space Beer

In 2006 scientists grew barley on the International Space Station as part of an experiment to determine whether crops can survive in space (and one day feed astronauts living up there). They found that "the barley showed almost no ill effects from growing in microgravity or radiation. The scientists found only one enzyme increased from slight oxygen deprivation, but the plants did well." Back on Earth Sapporo recently brewed 100 bottles of "Space Beer" from the barley.

An increase of only one enzyme? This must be disappointing news to the Chinese, who for decades have been blasting seeds and sperm into space, in the theory that the combination of cosmic radiation and microgravity will produce mutations that will yield larger, stronger varieties. They even have a Center for Space Breeding. I think they've been watching too many 1950's science-fiction movies.

Back in 2007 a purple "space potato" grown from seeds taken onboard the Shenzhou IV space mission were all the rage in Shanghai restaurants. (Reportedly they tasted more "glutinous" than normal potatoes.)

And in 2005, as I've noted before, there were reports the Chinese had carried pig sperm into space, in the hope of breeding larger, tastier pigs.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 06, 2008 - Comments (0)
Category: Food, Space Travel

The Front Line

As we all prepare for our imminent minimum-wage jobs during the economic meltdown, let us study how to perform them to the best of our abilities, with a cheerful smile. Consider the job of "supermarket checker," circa 1965.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Dec 02, 2008 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Products, Food, Jobs and Occupations, Movies, Documentaries, Retail Establishments, 1960s

Soggy, Mushy and Toughy

Who needs Iron Man or The Dark Knight, when you can watch Snap, Crackle and Pop battle their evil counterparts?

Posted By: Paul - Mon Dec 01, 2008 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Food, Movies, Cartoons, Children, 1930s, Fictional Monsters

A Day of Thanksgiving

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 26, 2008 - Comments (1)
Category: Family, Food, Holidays, Money, Documentaries, 1950s

Follies of the Mad Men #47

image
[From Life magazine for September 30 1940.]

You know what your problem is? Not enough yeast. I suggest increasing your beer intake.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Nov 21, 2008 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Health, 1940s

Follies of the Mad Men #46

image
[From Life magazine for March 5 1956.]

"Dig this crazy mixed-up ice cream!" "Man, it's real cool!"

Yeah, because beatniks like Maynard G. Krebs eat a lot of ice cream!

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 20, 2008 - Comments (12)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Fads, Food, Pop Culture, 1950s

Follies of the Mad Men #45

image
[From Life magazine for September 30 1940.]

What kind of kids would a shellfish and a bottle have, and how would they go about reproducing?

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 19, 2008 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Inebriation and Intoxicants, Foreign Customs, 1940s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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