Category:
Food

Space Beer

In 2006 scientists grew barley on the International Space Station as part of an experiment to determine whether crops can survive in space (and one day feed astronauts living up there). They found that "the barley showed almost no ill effects from growing in microgravity or radiation. The scientists found only one enzyme increased from slight oxygen deprivation, but the plants did well." Back on Earth Sapporo recently brewed 100 bottles of "Space Beer" from the barley.

An increase of only one enzyme? This must be disappointing news to the Chinese, who for decades have been blasting seeds and sperm into space, in the theory that the combination of cosmic radiation and microgravity will produce mutations that will yield larger, stronger varieties. They even have a Center for Space Breeding. I think they've been watching too many 1950's science-fiction movies.

Back in 2007 a purple "space potato" grown from seeds taken onboard the Shenzhou IV space mission were all the rage in Shanghai restaurants. (Reportedly they tasted more "glutinous" than normal potatoes.)

And in 2005, as I've noted before, there were reports the Chinese had carried pig sperm into space, in the hope of breeding larger, tastier pigs.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 06, 2008 - Comments (0)
Category: Food, Space Travel

The Front Line

As we all prepare for our imminent minimum-wage jobs during the economic meltdown, let us study how to perform them to the best of our abilities, with a cheerful smile. Consider the job of "supermarket checker," circa 1965.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Dec 02, 2008 - Comments (5)
Category: Business, Products, Food, Jobs and Occupations, Movies, Documentaries, Retail Establishments, 1960s

Soggy, Mushy and Toughy

Who needs Iron Man or The Dark Knight, when you can watch Snap, Crackle and Pop battle their evil counterparts?

Posted By: Paul - Mon Dec 01, 2008 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Food, Movies, Cartoons, Children, 1930s, Fictional Monsters

A Day of Thanksgiving

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 26, 2008 - Comments (1)
Category: Family, Food, Holidays, Money, Documentaries, 1950s

Follies of the Mad Men #47

image
[From Life magazine for September 30 1940.]

You know what your problem is? Not enough yeast. I suggest increasing your beer intake.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Nov 21, 2008 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Health, 1940s

Follies of the Mad Men #46

image
[From Life magazine for March 5 1956.]

"Dig this crazy mixed-up ice cream!" "Man, it's real cool!"

Yeah, because beatniks like Maynard G. Krebs eat a lot of ice cream!

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 20, 2008 - Comments (12)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Fads, Food, Pop Culture, 1950s

Follies of the Mad Men #45

image
[From Life magazine for September 30 1940.]

What kind of kids would a shellfish and a bottle have, and how would they go about reproducing?

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 19, 2008 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Inebriation and Intoxicants, Foreign Customs, 1940s

The Faces in the Broccoli

Cascadian Farm sells frozen organic broccoli florets. That's not particularly unusual.



But look closer. Can you see the tiny disembodied heads floating amidst the broccoli bits?




When contacted about it, Cascadian Farms offered this reply:
The tradition of hiding names or faces on Cascadian Farm packaging began over a dozen years ago. It was unspoken tribute by the package design department to the friends & family of Cascadian Farm. The faces won’t be included on our redesigned packaging.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 17, 2008 - Comments (7)
Category: Food, Advertising

How much for this meal?

Continuing the "overpriced stuff" theme that I began in a previous post, how much would you be willing to pay for this meal?

What you get -- Dinner at Masa, a sushi restaurant in NY City. From Wikipedia:

Reservations for the 26 available seats are taken three weeks in advance. Chef Masa prepares the menu himself, often including seasonal ingredients. He uses many exotic ingredients, such as truffles and Kobe beef; Most of the fish are flown in from Japan. Chef Masa can be seen working behind the bar and will sometimes serve the food as well.

There's no menu to order from. You get whatever you're served.

The cost: It's a fixed price of $400 per person, to which a 20% tip is automatically added. Then there's tax. So you're looking at a minimum of $513 per person. If you want anything to drink, be prepared to pay extra.

Via J-Walk, the receipt of a recent Masa diner, posted on Flickr. Seriously, if you're going to splurge by going there, why ruin the meal by getting a Diet Coke? Just ask for water.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Nov 12, 2008 - Comments (18)
Category: Food, Restaurants

Follies of the Mad Men #43

This appears to be an ad for a brand of French chewing gum. I'm not sure if the notion of a pair of used panties from the Statue of Liberty is adequate enticement to chew the company's product.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 12, 2008 - Comments (10)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Food, Statues, Monuments and Memorials

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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