Category:
Headgear

Muzzles for Ladies

Back in the day (between the 16th and 19th century) women who were deemed troublesome were sometimes made to wear a muzzle. The device was called a scold's bridle, or "the branks." More info here and here.

I think this device would be useful today, but instead of making women wear them, we should make them mandatory for politicians. As soon as someone declares their candidacy for public office, they'd have to strap on a muzzle. It would make life much more pleasant for everyone.





Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 05, 2012 - Comments (9)
Category: Torture, Headgear

Orange Yarn Beards

A follow-up to those etsy Bearded Beanies I posted about two weeks ago. Those were bad enough, but sending a teenager out in one of these Orange Yarn Beards seems downright cruel. They look a bit like mops attached to their faces. If you want to get one, they're available on etsy. Only $19!

Posted By: Alex - Wed May 16, 2012 - Comments (7)
Category: Fashion, Headgear

LEGO Wigs

By artist Elroy Klee.

Posted By: Alex - Sat May 05, 2012 - Comments (3)
Category: Fashion, Headgear

Bearded Beanies

Available on etsy, for those who think their cherub would look just adorable, if only he/she had a beard!





Found this via a blog called sad etsy kids, which is devoted to collecting pictures of kids who don't look like they're enjoying modeling their parents' creations.

Posted By: Alex - Tue May 01, 2012 - Comments (6)
Category: Fashion, Headgear

Johnson Smith Catalog Item #21

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I knew there was another reason to lament the passing of the custom of men wearing formal hats everywhere!

From the 1930s catalog.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Apr 09, 2012 - Comments (4)
Category: Johnson Smith Catalog, Signage, Headgear, 1930s

How lace curtains helped win World War II

The story goes that, during the Battle of the Bulge, in the winter of 1944, Sgt. William Furia (shown) decorated his helmet with some lace curtains that he found in an abandoned home. He did it as a joke, but then he and his fellow soldiers realized the lace made excellent camouflage in the snow. So the practice of decorating helmets with lace curtains became widespread. And thus camouflaged, the Allied soldiers were able to beat back the German offensive. Which is how lace curtains became America's secret weapon that allowed it to win the war.



Posted By: Alex - Wed Jan 18, 2012 - Comments (5)
Category: Fashion, Headgear, Military

Big Turbans

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Everyone knows that Sikhs wear turbans. But the size of the more ceremonial ones had escaped me.

Thanks to Deborah Newton.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Nov 16, 2010 - Comments (5)
Category: Religion, Reader Recommendation, Headgear

Turkey Hat

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It's not as great as the skunk hat, but it's pretty cool. And using a real turkey might get pretty messy.

Buy yours here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Nov 05, 2010 - Comments (5)
Category: Animals, Holidays, Headgear

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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