Category:
Inventions

Anti-Aging Mouthpiece


Searching for that youthful look? Forget expensive surgery or dangerous therapies! Japan has the answer and it is as simple as it is, well, unusual. Just pop the colorful Pupeko gently into your mouth, clench your jaw and breath in and out. This will then start training and tightening your cheek and jaw muscles, helping to offset the signs of aging and bringing a fresher, youthful look back again to your cheeks!

This easy-to-use beauty and skincare product was developed by an ordinary housewife. Chikako Hirama was simply concerned about her own age and wanted an easy way to combat those telltale lines. Just try the yellow or pink Pupeko daily using such techniques as puffing out your cheeks or sucking them in while breathing through the mouthpiece. Then you can try it while keeping your head upright to give your neck and other muscles further exercise training.

Buy yours here for $36.

via Book of Joe

Posted By: Alex - Sun Aug 28, 2016 - Comments (16)
Category: Inventions, Chindogu

Invention of the Shopping Cart



Modern, four-wheeled shopping carts were invented around 1937 by Sylvan Goldman, owner of the Standard Food and Humpty Dumpty grocery store chains in Oklahoma. Before then, shoppers either used hand baskets or the two-wheeled kind of carts. They also shopped more often.

The four-wheeled carts paved the way for the rise of massive supermarkets and big-box stores, because they allowed shoppers to accumulate more stuff before heading to the checkout.

However, in later years Goldman revealed that shoppers were initially reluctant to use the four-wheeled carts. They reminded women of pushing a baby carriage, and men thought they were unmanly.

So Goldman hired attractive models to push the carts around his stores:

"When a customer entered, a young lady would offer a shopping cart. If the shopper hesitated, the woman would say, "See, other people are using them. Why not try it?"
"This was the gimmick that did the trick and the carts were then accepted without further difficulty," Goldman said.


Albuquerque Journal - Aug 27, 1976







Mar 12 - 1984

Posted By: Alex - Sun Aug 07, 2016 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions

Flying Wings

In some alternate timeline, the skies are full of flying wing-type airplanes.




Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 22, 2016 - Comments (6)
Category: Inventions, Air Travel and Airlines, 1940s, Armed Forces

Odd Bicycles



Posted By: Paul - Mon Jul 18, 2016 - Comments (1)
Category: Bicycles and Other Human-powered Vehicles, Eccentrics, Inventions, 1930s

Clip-On Armpit Fan

The latest invention from Japan. Sold by Thanko.

If you're wearing shorts, you could also use it as a crotch fan.





via RocketNews 24

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jul 15, 2016 - Comments (8)
Category: Inventions

Tricycle Black Maria

image

Served the extra duty of public humiliation of criminal.

Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jul 11, 2016 - Comments (3)
Category: Bicycles and Other Human-powered Vehicles, Cops, Crime, Inventions, Nineteenth Century

The Alkoholomat



Don't drive drunk on the holiday--or any day! The penalty could be worse even than ending up as an item in NOTW!

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jul 04, 2016 - Comments (2)
Category: Humor, Inventions, 1960s, Europe, Alcohol, Cars

Bob “Bazooka” Burns



Full story here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jun 28, 2016 - Comments (2)
Category: Inventions, Outsider Art, 1940s, Comedians

Trick Valise

March 1937: A tricked-out payroll satchel foiled would-be robbers. From Newsweek (Apr 3, 1937):

In Harrison, N.J., bandits last week held up a messenger and seized his satchel containing a $2,700 pay roll. They didn't notice their victim pull a wire in the bag's handle as he handed it over. Ten seconds later revolver blanks inside the satchel started exploding and clouds of sulphur smoke belched from holes in the bottom. In terror the gunmen dropped their loot and fled.

Quite ingenious, but seems like it would work only once, since after that everyone would know what the trick was. So how did they protect the payroll subsequently?

Newsweek - Apr 3, 1937



St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Mar 26, 1937

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jun 18, 2016 - Comments (5)
Category: Crime, Inventions, 1930s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Chuck Shepherd
Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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