Jayne Mansfield’s Hand

1958: Journalist tries to record in words the exact sensation of touching Jayne Mansfield's hand.

I had never seen the phrase "gone sensation" and thought maybe it was a typo, but Merriam-Webster defines it as "a feeling of faintness or weakness."

Spokane Daily Chronicle - Apr 17, 1958


Jake Gets Thrill, Peachy Sensation From Jane's Hand
KINGSVILLE, Texas, April 17. — Jake Trussell of the Kingsville Record held hands with Jayne Mansfield while posing for a photograph during a news conference.
"I must report exactly how it felt to hold her hand," Trussell told his readers. "The sensation I got was of a long personalized sort of slightly over-heated peach fuzz expanse, or perhaps the snuggly softness of a glamorized baby duck's down. Anyway, it was a real gone sensation."
A picture of Miss Mansfield and Trussell showed that she was wearing gloves.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Sep 26, 2015
Category: Celebrities, Sex Symbols, 1950s





Comments
Alex, I checked our MW Unabridged from 1999 and the closest I could find was 'goneness' which could mean faintness but it's left over from 1850 or there abouts. The etymology dictionary I use doesn't list it, nor does either of the slang dictionaries we have (one US and one UK).

But, if we back off a bit and just let the word 'gone' stand alone and not part of a phrase then MW (even online) will give you meaning of 'a sinking feeling' making 'sensation' nothing more than a redundant addition in the sentence.

I think "Jake got the vapors" would have been a turn of phrase.
Posted by Expat47 in Athens, Greece on 09/26/15 at 09:31 AM
I think the whole thing makes Jake come off as a creepy dude. Wonder how long it was till he washed that hand again.
Posted by Patty in Ohio, USA on 09/26/15 at 09:44 AM
Alex--you and Expat are overthinking the meaning of "gone sensation," esp, given the year 1958. Plainly, you two need to refresh your beatnik/hepcat vocabulary.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/real+gone
Posted by Paul on 09/26/15 at 11:19 AM
Au contraire, Paul, had the dude used 'real gone' I'd agree with you (even though I was but a sprout back then) but 'gone sensation' was written.
Posted by Expat47 in Athens, Greece on 09/26/15 at 12:23 PM
It's a bygone "thrill up my leg."
Posted by Therese Z on 09/26/15 at 12:28 PM
Take a second look, Expat: "real gone sensation."
Posted by Paul on 09/26/15 at 01:00 PM
You're right! Alex lead me astray with his wily ways and slick words. red face
Posted by Expat47 in Athens, Greece on 09/26/15 at 01:52 PM
Thanks for clearing up the confusion, Paul. I was befuddled by the beatnik.
Posted by Alex on 09/26/15 at 02:24 PM
I wonder if something was running down his leg after he held hands with her?
Posted by Gator Guy in The Great Swamp on 09/26/15 at 06:36 PM
Almost looks like Kate Upton in the picture posted.
I was wondering from his description if she had hairy hands, until I read the last line. Funny.
Posted by GFnKS in near oz, ks on 09/28/15 at 01:37 PM
Obviously no one commenting here was around when this was printed, since 'gone' was a common beat (as in beatnik) term : "Gone" referred to something very good or quite desirable as in, "That girl is one gone lady." Author Jack Kerouac introduced the phrase "Beat Generation" in 1948. It morphed into 'far-out' in the '60's.
Posted by beckiru on 09/28/15 at 05:06 PM
@beckiru: You better watch what you say around here you young whipper-snapper or us old'uns will be a gettin' after ya'. I was 10 when that article was printed.
Posted by Expat47 in Athens, Greece on 09/29/15 at 12:55 AM
Looking at that picture of her, I see a couple of things I'd rather hold than her hands!
Posted by Bill Frank on 10/05/15 at 08:06 AM
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