Category:
1940s

Transparent Face Mask

From Popular Science, March 1940:

Slipped over the head, a bag of cellulose tissue designed for use in skiing and other outdoor sports offers protection for the face without interfering with vision. The transparent mask can also be used as a shower cap, an apron, a tray cover, and a turban, the makers say.

Maybe it didn't interfere with vision, but the interfering with breathing probably posed a problem.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 16, 2009 - Comments (7)
Category: Inventions, Products, 1940s

Mugshots of Moonshiners

Mugshots of Southern moonshiners, from Life Magazine (Jan 1, 1940):


During 1939, agents working out of Atlanta destroyed $423946-worth of illicit distilling apparatus. But this comparatively small figure represented 4325 stills, with a total estimated capacity of 650000 gallons per day.
Of the convicted moonshiners above, most famous is Theressa Brown (fourth row, center). Known to agents as "Queen of the Bootleggers," she has been arrested 22 times, mostly for liquor-law violation, but once for arson, once for shooting her husband.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Mar 26, 2009 - Comments (14)
Category: Crime, Inebriation and Intoxicants, 1940s

The Private Life of a Cat

And now, 20+ minutes of kitties, from Maya Deren's husband, Alexander Hammid.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Mar 24, 2009 - Comments (14)
Category: Documentaries, Cats, 1940s

Donald Duck in THE PLASTICS INVENTOR

So it's Donald Duck who's responsible for a world choking in plastic gimcracks!

Posted By: Paul - Sun Mar 15, 2009 - Comments (9)
Category: Technology, Cartoons, Documentaries, 1940s

Weekend in Havana

Can you sing as fast as Carmen Miranda does in this tune, "Rebola a Bola," from WEEKEND IN HAVANA?

I found the Portuguese lyrics and had Google translate them. The eccentric result is to be found after the jump: original line in Portuguese followed by English "translation."





More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Sat Feb 21, 2009 - Comments (7)
Category: Fashion, Human Marvels, Movies, Music, 1940s, South America

Bad Luck Blackie

We all know that cartoon genius Tex Avery was an utter madman in his animation. But BAD LUCK BLACKIE strikes me as the most bizzare and surreal example of his art that I've ever seen.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Feb 20, 2009 - Comments (17)
Category: Pop Art, Surrealism, Cartoons, Cats, Dogs, 1940s

Follies of the Mad Men #56

image

image
[Upper image from Look magazine for June 20 1961. Lower image from Look magazine for April 24 1962.]

A special "two-fer" installment of the Follies thread. Two splendid representations of our friends, the Native Americans, from within the lifetimes of many WU readers.

They hate cheap cigars, but are experts in premium house paints.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 16, 2009 - Comments (13)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1940s, Native Americans

Cobra Woman

I saw Maria Montez's COBRA WOMAN about a year ago. But I had to buy an all-regions DVD player and order the DVD from England, since it's unavailable here. But the expense was worth it, as I think you'll agree after you watch the trailer.



Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 16, 2009 - Comments (8)
Category: Animals, Magic and Illusions and Sleight of Hand, Movies, Pop Culture, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1940s

Young Man Standing on His Head

From the Feb. 9, 1948 issue of Life magazine:

Young Man Stands on Head Before 48 State Capitols
For years sensitive citizens have loudly deplored the antique ugliness of the country's older state capitols. Now a hardheaded young Chicagoan named John G. Nichols, who appears upside down all over these two pages, has discarded words for drastic action. To illustrate his monumental distaste for the architecture of most state capitols he has managed to have his picture taken standing on his head before all 48 of them... He stood on his head in rain, snow, slush and mud and often had a terrible time getting people to take his picture. "They thought I was crazy," he explains modestly.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 06, 2009 - Comments (16)
Category: Architecture, 1940s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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