Category:
Food

Miss Hot Dog 1960

Source: The Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia) 06 Jul 1960, Wed Page 16


Posted By: Paul - Sat May 29, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Food, Sexuality, Public Indecency

Banana Ganesh

Read all about it here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon May 24, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Animals, Art, Statues and Monuments, Food, Religion, Bananas

Follies of the Madmen #507

Lecherous donut wants new franchisers.





Posted By: Paul - Tue May 18, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Food, 1950s

Mrs. Rorer’s Vegetable Cookery and Meat Substitutes

Beyond Meat? Impossible Burger? You'll turn your nose up at these after you've tasted some of Mrs. Rorer's vegetarian recipes!

Read the whole book here.









Posted By: Paul - Wed Apr 21, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, Vegetarians and Vegans, 1900s, Nausea, Revulsion and Disgust

Fancy Feast Recipes for Humans

Another odd cookbook: Cat-food maker Fancy Feast has released a book of recipes for humans. As explained in the book's introduction:

each of the recipes in this cookbook gives a nod to the dishes you'll be serving your cat, yet made for humans. Using palate-pleasing ingredients like chicken, salmon, and whitefish, these dishes complement Fancy Feast's entrée options so you can have what they're having—an elegant and delicious meal.

Apparently anticipating that few people would be willing to buy this cookbook, they've posted it online as a free downoad.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 15, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Food, Cookbooks, Cats

The American Airlines Recipe Book

We recently posted about the American Airlines Wine Club, which allows people to enjoy wines served inflight at home. Turns out that in 1994 the company did something similar with its airline food, publishing a recipe book so that people could "prepare their inflight favorites at home". It was titled A Taste of Something Special.

The book was given to frequent fliers, rather than being sold to the public. But you can now download a pdf of the entire thing via Michigan State University Library.





Yonkers Herald Statesman - Feb 8, 1996

Posted By: Alex - Wed Apr 14, 2021 - Comments (8)
Category: Food, Cookbooks, Air Travel and Airlines, 1990s

Lys Chelys, French Female Fakir

Modern performers like David Blaine, who entomb themselves in glass boxes, are carrying on an old tradition, as seen below in the first video with Lys Chelys.

The still photo shows her exiting her "sarcophage" after 57 days without eating.

After her items, we have a full movie utilizing the same theme.





Photo source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Mar 05, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Magic and Illusions and Sleight of Hand, Performance Art, 1950s, Europe, United Kingdom

Baitinger’s Automatic Eater

I posted last week about a 1940's invention which envisioned putting restaurant diners on a conveyor belt so that they could be carried past food stations. Several readers commented that the Japanese have embraced the opposite concept, of putting the food on a conveyor belt so that it travels past the diners.

I did some research and discovered that the origin of the idea of having food on a conveyor belt traces all the way back to 1919 when John Moses Baitinger of Minnesota applied for a patent on this concept, which he called his "Automatic Eater". His patent was granted in 1923. He had small wooden cars, laden with food and drinks, moving along tracks, pulled by a system of cables.





Karal Ann Marling discusses some of the history of Baitinger's invention in her book Blue Ribbon: A Social and Pictorial History of the Minnesota State Fair:

One of the strangest devices ever seen at the Minnesota State Fair was Baitinger's Automatic Eater. A kind of mechanized restaurant, the Eater consisted of a 150-foot-long counter along which moved a procession of eighty-five wooden cars propelled by a system of cables embedded in a groove in the surface. The cars held food, and diners snatched for their favorite dishes as the train coursed past. Some cars had drawers filled with ice, to keep fruit or celery fresh; some were warmed with heated soapstones.

The ensemble was the invention of the Reverend J.M. Baitinger, an Evangelic churchman, who stationed himself out in front with a megaphone to ballyhoo a new era in state fair dining: "Haba! Haba! Haba! This is the place to be merry. Eat! Eat! Eat! All you want for 50 cents; for without a full stomach you cannot enjoy the fair. Haba! Haba! Haba!"

The Automatic Eater cost Baitinger more than one thousand dollars to build but, because of its novelty and the economies it permitted, the cafe more than paid for itself during a trial run conducted on the last few days of the 1920 fair. "Through the medium of the Automatic Eater," he stated the following summer, "I do away with all excess help and employ only one cook, a dish washer, and a woman to keep the train well stocked with food. I pay no attention to what my customers eat, how long they stay or how much food they consume." But there were healthy profits, which Baitinger turned over to a St. Paul hospital.

Baitinger's Eater was, in many ways, a perfect expression of the mentality of the automation-mad 1920s, obsessed with speed, technology, and efficiency. There were minor drawbacks to the system, however. Diners seated near the end of the line sometimes found that the only cargo left for the eating was boiled cabbage.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Feb 28, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, Inventions, Restaurants, 1910s

The Sundae of Tomorrow

The centerpiece of the 1939 New York World's Fair was a pair of structures known as the Trylon and Perisphere. Even today, they look very futuristic.



It occurred to some that the structures looked a bit like a scoop of ice cream and an upside-down cone. This inspired ice-cream parlors throughout America to offer what they called the "World's Fair Sundae" or the "Sundae of Tomorrow".



Hagerstown Daily Mail - July 21, 1939



It's a nice looking sundae. I'd get one if they were offered today. Though now the reference would be lost on most people.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Feb 19, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Food, Junk Food, 1930s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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