Category:
Photography and Photographers

Tiny People

The Johansens are a father-son team of photographers who specialize in using the figurines from a model railroad set to create bizarre scenes. Their website is tinypeoplebiglaughs.com.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Nov 29, 2013 - Comments (7)
Category: Photography and Photographers

Alien Spaceship?

Here's a Google Earth photo of something at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. That might be a good enough hint.

image

There's another hint in the categories listing.

Click on the link to learn the fascinating truth.

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2013-02/captured-on-googl-earth-mysterious-barcode-patterns-strewn-across-us-land

Posted By: gdanea - Fri Aug 02, 2013 - Comments (2)
Category: Photography and Photographers

The “Madeleine” Odor Camera

"The Madeleine works in much the same way as a 35mm camera. Just as the camera records the light information of a visual in order to create a replica The Madeleine records the chemical information of a smell."

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jul 11, 2013 - Comments (5)
Category: Photography and Photographers

Antique Homicide Photos from NYC Archives

image

Over 300 gruesomely fascinating murder victims, at the NYC Archives. Of course, the 800K+ other shots are pretty cool as well.

Posted By: Paul - Tue May 28, 2013 - Comments (4)
Category: Death, Photography and Photographers, Urban Life, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, Blood

Screengrab

Posted By: Paul - Tue May 21, 2013 - Comments (3)
Category: Body, Photography and Photographers, Surrealism

Revolver Camera

Paul once posted about a camera that looked like a gun. This does that one better. It's a camera AND a gun. Pull the trigger and it simultaneously takes a picture of and shoots a bullet at whomever you're aiming the gun at. It was created and used in the late 1930s in New York City. [via petapixel]

Posted By: Alex - Sun May 05, 2013 - Comments (3)
Category: Guns, Photography and Photographers, 1930s

Jumpology

Philippe Halsman became famous as the photographer who took photos of people jumping. In 1959 he published his Jump Book, which was a collection of photos of famous people jumping. He called his technique "jumpology," arguing that the act of jumping helped his subjects temporarily cast aside their reserve and show their true selves.

After the publication of his book, jumpology became a popular fad for a while. People would use polaroid cameras to take photos of each other at parties jumping. Reminiscent of the more recent planking fad.

Some examples of Halsman's jump photos are below, and you can find more of them over at Iconic Photos:


Hattie Jacques


Aldous Huxley


The Duke and Duchess of Windsor

Posted By: Alex - Sat Mar 23, 2013 - Comments (4)
Category: Photography and Photographers, 1950s

In one end, out the other

Apologies in advance for the crappy post. I'll let the artist, Gabriel Morais, explain his project:

The idea behind this project, is to show how much the food we ingest affects our body, therefore the colour of each poop was not manipulated on photoshop. To achieve the result, the quantity I ate for each picture was:
4.5kg of beet root in 36 hours.
3.5kg of Froot Loops in 30 hours.
4kg of sweet corn in 36 hours.

So in the photos below, he shows what he ate first, followed by what eventually came out the other end.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Mar 22, 2013 - Comments (6)
Category: Art, Body, Food, Photography and Photographers, Excrement

Naked woman in a box of rabbit fur

The University of Washington Library staff posted this mysterious image on their flickr stream. Why is this naked woman lounging in a box of rabbit fur? No one knows. The only info the UW staff has is that the image was taken around 1930 by photographer Vern Grost, perhaps in Washington state. They speculate it may show some kind of promotional event for the Angora rabbit fur industry.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jan 18, 2013 - Comments (5)
Category: Photography and Photographers, 1930s

Alexa Meade’s photographs that look like paintings

From her website:

Rather than creating representational paintings on a flat canvas, Alexa Meade creates her representational paintings directly on top of the physical subjects that she is referencing. When photographed, the representational painting and the subject being referenced appear to be one and the same as the 3D space of her painted scenes becomes optically compressed into a 2D plane.








Posted By: Alex - Wed Jan 16, 2013 - Comments (4)
Category: Photography and Photographers

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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