Buried Alive Experiment

1926: French journalist Paul Heuzé sealed himself in an air-tight coffin to investigate how fakirs performed this feat. He lasted one hour and fifteen minutes before signalling that he needed to be let out.

More info about Heuzé at Wikipedia.

Illustrated London News - Dec 11, 1926



East Liverpool Evening Review - Dec 23, 1926

     Posted By: Alex - Mon May 10, 2021
     Category: Experiments | 1920s





Comments
This reminded me of Harry Houdini's feat, when he stayed underwater in a sealed coffin for almost an hour and a half. Coincidentally, he did this just a few months earlier, on August 5, 1926. The Library of Congress has a copy of a Washington Post article about it.
https://www.loc.gov/resource/varshoud.hs044/?r=-0.182,0.128,1.317,0.809,0
Posted by Fritz on 05/10/21 at 10:11 AM
Reminds me of a PBS or Discovery show that re-enacted 3 doctors looking for a general anesthesia in the 19th century. They managed to avoid killing themselves and decided on chloroform, as I recall.
Posted by Virtual in Carnate on 05/11/21 at 11:28 AM
I recall an episode of “Mythbusters” where they sealed someone in a modern, watertight casket. He lasted only a few minutes before running out of air.
Posted by Brian on 05/11/21 at 09:24 PM









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