Weird Universe
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Life, The Universe and Everything

A mind-blowing four plus minutes!! At about :40 a series of circles puts us all into perspective as the longest zoom out ever shows our place in the universe.



I feel pretty insignificant after all of that.

A quick zoom in at about 3:00 reverses the process, then examines the sub-atomic world -- but I'm not sure what the stuff at the end could be. Guesses or actual explanations are welcome.
Posted By: gdanea | Date: Sat Dec 08, 2012 | Number of Comments: 7
Category: Spaceflight, Astronautics, and Astronomy
More weirdness from the WU archive:
Comments
Listed in chronological order. Newest comments at the end.
Monty Python did it better- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buqtdpuZxvk

@BD That's not cool, A Gentleman does NOT kiss and tell! cool mad
Posted by Tyrusguy on 12/08/12 at 09:20 PM
That ending puts me in mind of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The end is the beginnings, etc.
Posted by Expat47 in Athens, Greece on 12/09/12 at 12:35 AM
Expat, Men In Black does much the same thing with the galaxy and a marble.
Posted by TheCannyScot in Atlanta, GA on 12/09/12 at 10:39 AM
I equated that more with the quip in Hitchhiker's Guide to the planet that sent an invasion fleet to neighboring planet and it got swallowed by a dog.
Posted by Expat47 in Athens, Greece on 12/09/12 at 10:44 AM
Life holds infinite universes without and within.
Posted by patty in Ohio, USA on 12/09/12 at 07:59 PM
This seems to be the latest version of "Powers of 10." A book was published by the Scientific American Library that traced phenomena from 1 meter and expanding in powers of 10 (1, 10, 100, 1000, etc) and then decreasing in powers of 10 (1, 0.1, 0.01, 0.001, etc.). The publication was to show how few powers of ten encompassed the entire universe from the largest to smallest things known. The circles in the video show whenever we reach the next power of 10.

The book is cool. This video is even cooler. Thanks.
Posted by John in Abilene, TX on 12/10/12 at 09:29 AM
How fitting at this time with the news of the loss of that Great British eccentric astronomer, Sir Patrick Moore. He truly great man remembered fondly by millions.
Posted by Tony in UK on 12/10/12 at 03:15 PM
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