Weird Universe Archive

November 2019

November 18, 2019

Weirdo the Cat-Killing Superchicken

Weirdo was a giant among chickens. He weighed a colossal twenty-three pounds — about four times the size of an average rooster. Throughout much of the 1970s and 80s, he was listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the heaviest chicken in the world. He was said to have the strength and stamina of an ostrich.

"Grant Sullens holds his prize 23-lb. White Sully rooster. Note the gloves he is wearing for protection. Note also that the photographer stayed on the safe side of the fence." Source: Farm Journal - Nov 1971.

However, Weirdo had a temper and ferocity that matched his size. His violent exploits were legendary. He killed two cats and pecked out the eye of a dog. He routinely tore bits of metal off his feed bucket, demolishing feeders at a rate of one per month. When an ungloved visitor made the mistake of trying to touch him, he removed their fingertip. He shattered the lens of a camera. And, in his crowning achievement, he managed to rip through a wire fence and attacked and killed one of his own sons, an eighteen-pound rooster.

Just as unusual as Weirdo himself was the story of how he came to exist. He was the result of a seven-year chicken-breeding program conducted by a teenage boy, Grant Sullens, of West Point, California. Sullens had decided that he wanted to create a breed of "superchickens," and he actually achieved his goal, succeeding where highly paid poultry researchers had failed.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 18, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Animals, Farming, 1970s

Follies of the Madmen #453

The wealthy always employ midgets to help them dress. Seriously, what size is that person standing on the chair? Maybe the gal in undergarments is a giant?



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Nov 18, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Ambiguity, Uncertainty and Deliberate Obscurity, Business, Advertising, Confusion, Misunderstanding, and Incomprehension, Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Surrealism, Underwear, 1940s

November 17, 2019

When the Cook Can’t Look

A cookbook for the blind, written by Ralph Read, and published in 1981.



A sample of some of his tips and techniques, from a review in the Austin American-Statesman (Sep 22, 1980):

Many of his suggestions are common sense. For instance, for liquid measurements, he uses the dipstick method — having an index finger in the right place at the right time. He uses a teaspoon to spread instead of a knife, allowing himself “one finger to check corners.” And he initials canned foods with raised letters from a plastic tape marker and arranges them alphabetically.

You don’t need to alphabetize bags of things, he says, because you can just pinch them. Split peas do not feel like elbow macaroni.

Tactile memory is very important, for things like knowing which end of a milk carton has the spout. Spices don’t need labeling because you can smell them. Smell and hearing are important factors in cooking without sight. They tell you when things are almost done.

He generally cooks slowly to help “prevent things from getting away from me.” Read has no special gadgets for cooking, though he says friends have shown him catalogs with specialty items for the blind. “Ninety-nine percent of that gadgetry is useless — though I’m interested in the fact that Amana has a blind consultant working with them in Dallas to help develop a microwave oven for the blind.”

There are some definite “don’ts,” Read says, such as not using dangerous items such as an electric beater or broiler. You can get the same desired results without unnecessary risk by using a hand beater or pan-broiling a steak.

You can read the entire book at archive.org.



Posted By: Alex - Sun Nov 17, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Food, Books, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

November 16, 2019

Glue Perfume

Sold by Demeter Fragrances, which specializes in weird perfumes.

Some of their other scents include Condensed Milk, Dirt, Earthworm, Fireplace, Funeral Home, Laundromat, Pizza, Play-Doh, Sawdust, and Stable.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Nov 16, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Perfume and Cologne and Other Scents

Right and Wrong in Fashion



"Street Fashion Critic:" good excuse to ogle women.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 16, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Experts and Authority Figures, Fashion, 1940s

November 15, 2019

A woman dressed only in her hair

Now arises Mrs. Lydia McPherson of Los Angeles, California… Her friends claim that if Lady Godiva had possessed hair like Mrs. McPherson, she would have been more than adequately attired in her famous ride through the streets of Coventry. Mrs. McPherson surpasses Mother Eve, by wearing, as her picture shows, only nature’s covering, whereas the world’s first lady had to borrow from the fig tree. The tresses of Mrs. McPherson measure seven feet two inches from root to tip, and are of a find, bright red color.
San Francisco Examiner - Jun 26, 1927


(left) In her birthday suit; (right) fully clothed



Below: Looking a bit like that girl from The Ring movie.

St. Louis Post Dispatch - Apr 24, 1927



The Ring girl, for comparison:



Some more images of Lydia McPherson and her long hair:

(left) at the 1933 Chicago Odditorium, where she was advertised as having "the longest red hair in the world" (via pbs.org); (right) undated photo (via sisterwolf).

Posted By: Alex - Fri Nov 15, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: 1920s, Hair and Hairstyling

November 14, 2019

Miss Sasquatch Queen

At the Sasquatch Winter Carnival in Saskatchewan, they annually elected a "Miss Sasquatch Queen." Laura Medland, below, was the 1969 winner. Note the Sasquatch patch she's wearing.

Regina Leader-Post - Feb 25, 1970



And there seems to have been a rival Miss Sasquatch contest: the Sasquatch queen pageant held at the Regina Inn. Dona Doan, below, won that title in 1969.

So, in 1969 there were two Sasquatch Queens in Saskatchewan.

Regina Leader-Post - Feb 17, 1969

Posted By: Alex - Thu Nov 14, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, 1960s

Benefits from the Space Program



You can read the text at the source.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 14, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Cosmetics, Spaceflight, Astronautics, and Astronomy

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

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