Weird Universe Archive

May 2020

May 21, 2020

Clint Bolin, Rock Collector

Clint Bolin collected rocks. That, in itself, isn't weird. However, Bolin made it weird by hoarding massive amounts of rocks of absolutely no value. He also collected chunks of concrete and slabs of cement.

When he vacated his Long Beach apartment in 1975, he left behind 60,000 pounds of rocks, all neatly boxed. There were about 600 rock boxes, each weighing over 100 lbs.

Strangely, no one had ever seen him carrying any of these boxes in. And he was only a frail man, weighing about 150 lbs. Plus, he had only lived in the apartment for four months. So how he managed to accumulate so many boxes of rocks in his apartment remains a mystery.

I haven't been able to find any sources that describe what became of him after he made headlines in 1975. It's as if he disappeared into thin air.

Los Angeles Times - May 8, 1975





Posted By: Alex - Thu May 21, 2020 - Comments (5)
Category: Hobbies and DIY, 1970s

Las Pozas

When travel resumes, here's a destination alluring to any WU-vie.



Read more on the creator here.

His Wikipedia entry.

Posted By: Paul - Thu May 21, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Outsider Art, Surrealism, Eccentrics, Twentieth Century

May 20, 2020

Safety Kisses

Throughout the 20th century, it seemed to be widely assumed that the mood of the husband was determined by the behavior of his wife at home. So, concluded the District of Columbia's traffic safety office in 1963, if a man was in a 'disgruntled disposition' and consequently got into a traffic accident, it must have been the fault of his wife who didn't cheer him up adequately when he left home with a goodbye kiss "as though she meant it."

See also: Whose fault is it when your husband is cross at breakfast?

Minneapolis Star - Nov 12, 1963

Posted By: Alex - Wed May 20, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Highways, Roads, Streets and Traffic, Gender, Husbands, Wives, 1960s

May 19, 2020

Trapped 5 days in folding bed

Unfortunately, I can't find any info about how Leon Colby fared after his 5-day ordeal trapped in a folding bed.

The situation seems like an absurdist, real-life variation on the premise of Stephen King's Gerald's Game.

Lancaster Intelligencer Journal - Oct 10, 1977



Some googling reveals that, while being trapped in a folding bed may sound bizarre, it's disturbingly common. See here, here, and here.

Posted By: Alex - Tue May 19, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Accidents, Furniture, 1970s

“I have a trunkful of money to deposit”



Charlie Becker, midget trainer with Singer's Midgets, walked the smallest elephant of his troupe to Merchant's Bank, and made a deposit for Keith's Theatre. The elephant delivered the money satchel directly to the receiving teller


Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue May 19, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Money, 1920s

May 18, 2020

Perfume-O-Books

In 1960, Monarch Books announced the launch of Perfume-o-Books. These were books infused with perfume.

They had plans to use a saddle-leather scent for westerns, floral odors for flower-arrangement books, and food scents for cookbooks.

All of which seemed logical. However, they decided to launch the line with three movie tie-in titles: "The Enemy General," by Dan Pepper, "The Stranglers of Bombay," by Stuart James, and "The Brides of Dracula," by Dean Owen. These three titles were each infused with a "Chanel 5 type perfume."

They seem like very odd titles to have been perfumed. And evidently the perfume didn't appreciably help sales, because no more perfume-o-book titles were ever printed.



Richmond Times Dispatch - Apr 17, 1960

Posted By: Alex - Mon May 18, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Books, 1960s, Perfume and Cologne and Other Scents

Mystery Gadget 84



What does this machine do? Hint: it looks enormously overdesigned for its simple function.

The answer is here.

Or after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Mon May 18, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Technology, 1930s

May 17, 2020

Frederick Newbery’s long-distance milk pipes

Frederick Newbery envisioned pipes transporting milk underground from farms directly into cities. He received a patent for this idea in 1874 (No. 148,620). Though as far as I know, his long-distance milk pipes were never put into practice.

Posted By: Alex - Sun May 17, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions, Nineteenth Century

Your Biological Safety Mask

Posted By: Paul - Sun May 17, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Health, War, Children

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

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