Category:
Art

Jim’s Guide to San Francisco

In 1977, artist James Patrick Finnegan published an oddball guide to San Francisco, titled Jim's Guide to San Francisco. It consisted of pictures of him posing in front of San Francisco businesses that were named Jim: Jim's Barber Shop, Jim's Donut Shop, Jim's Transportation, Jim's Smoke Shop, etc.

The book was printed in black-and-white, but he handcolored parts of it with a crayon. I assume he individually handcolored each copy sold.

I haven't been able to find any scanned copies of the book online, and only one copy of it for sale. The seller is asking $300, justifying that price by the book's rarity.

It's been almost 50 years since the book came out, so Finnegan should do an updated guide. I'm sure there's now a whole new batch of businesses in the city named Jim.







Posted By: Alex - Fri Jun 28, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Books, Tourists and Tourism, 1970s

Paint your own modern abstracts

True magazine - Jan 1969

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jun 27, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Advertising, 1960s

Painting mistaken for dropcloth

The classic weird-news theme of art mistaken for trash.

Raleigh News and Observer - Sep 27, 1979



Triple Variants by Sam Gilliam (source: GSA Fina Arts Collection)

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jun 25, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, 1970s

Hurting the Word Radio #2

The 1964 painting "Hurting the Word Radio #2" by Ed Ruscha is valued at $53 million. It's reportedly one of the most expensive works of art owned by Jeff Bezos.

image source: google arts and culture



The value surprised me when I read about it, though it probably shouldn't have because sky-high valuations for works of modern art are by now, as Chuck Shepherd would have said, "no longer weird."

Even so, as the Center for Art Law notes, Ruscha created hundreds of words on canvas over the decades. How did this one get singled out to be worth so much? Ruscha himself never promoted it as special. (Nor does he directly benefit from its current valuation.)

The Center for Art Law suggests that the work's "impeccable and unimpeachable" provenance may have a lot to do with the high price tag. In an art market awash in fraud, undeniably authentic works command a high premium.

Posted By: Alex - Sat May 18, 2024 - Comments (2)
Category: Art, Overpriced Merchandise

Mr. Squiggle

All is explained at the Wikipedia page.

Weird as the newer version is, the 1950s show was even weirder. Go to this link, for a non-embeddable sample.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Apr 10, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Art, Puppets and Automatons, Television, Space Travel, Australia, Twentieth Century

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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