Category:
Twentieth Century

Artwork Khrushchev Probably Would Not Have Liked 46

Two links to the Wikipedia pages of the Themersons, husband and wife team of avant-gardists.

Small essay here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 31, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Surrealism, Movies, Twentieth Century

The Nine LaFalce Brothers

There have been any number of family singing groups. Many pop bands feature two brothers. The Beach Boys added cousins. Sister groups were popular in the forties and fifties. And finally, the famous Trapp Family featured ten children and two parents. But I do not believe any other act than the now-forgotten LaFalces had nine brothers onstage together.









Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 29, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Family, Music, Twentieth Century

Josiah Oldfield, the Fruitarian Hospital and Kissing

Fruitarianism is a kind of vegetarian practice which today seems very strict. But 100 years ago, when Josiah Oldfield practiced it, there was more variety allowed in the diet.

Oldfield advocated for fruitarianism, putting him at odds with the Vegetarian Society.[16] He was a member of the Fruitarian Society, whose members lived on "the produce of harvest field, garden, forest and orchard, with milk, butter, cheese, eggs and honey".[6] His own "fruitarianism" was close to ovo-lacto vegetarianism. He was not a vegan: he recommended a daily diet of dandelion leaves, eggs, grapes, honey, lettuce, milk, salad, and watercress.


In any case, Oldfield founded several hospitals whose healing methods involved this diet. See the video below for more details. I have no idea of their success rate.

However, he found time to theorize about other things besides diet, such as the art of kissing. I apologize for the illegibility of the snapshot. Here's a sample or two of the text.





Newpaper source: Omaha Sunday Bee-News (Omaha, Nebraska) 30 Aug 1931, Sun Page 41





Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 01, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Hospitals, Hygiene, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, Love & Romance

The Tonight Shirt

NOTE: Positively not endorsed by Johnny Carson!

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 20, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Fashion, Television, Advertising, Twentieth Century

Sgt. Reckless

With thanks to reader Sherry Mowbray.



The Wikipedia page.

Staff Sergeant Reckless (c. 1948 – May 13, 1968), a decorated war horse who held official rank in the United States military,[2] was a mare of Mongolian horse breeding. Out of a race horse dam, she was purchased in October 1952 for $250 from a Korean stableboy at the Seoul racetrack who needed money to buy an artificial leg for his sister.[3] Reckless was bought by members of the United States Marine Corps and trained to be a pack horse for the Recoilless Rifle Platoon, Anti-Tank Company, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division.[2] She quickly became part of the unit and was allowed to roam freely through camp, entering the Marines' tents, where she would sleep on cold nights, and was known for her willingness to eat nearly anything, including scrambled eggs, beer, Coca-Cola and, once, about $30 worth of poker chips.

She served in numerous combat actions during the Korean War, carrying supplies and ammunition, and was also used to evacuate wounded. Learning each supply route after only a couple of trips, she often traveled to deliver supplies to the troops on her own, without benefit of a handler. The highlight of her nine-month military career came in late March 1953 during the Battle for Outpost Vegas when, in a single day, she made 51 solo trips to resupply multiple front line units. She was wounded in combat twice and was given the battlefield rank of corporal in 1953 and then a battlefield promotion to sergeant in 1954, several months after the war ended. She also became the first horse in the Marine Corps known to have participated in an amphibious landing, and following the war was awarded two Purple Hearts, a Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, inclusion in her unit's Presidential Unit Citations from two countries, and other military honors.


The home page.



Posted By: Paul - Sun Jun 26, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Animals, War, Reader Recommendation, Twentieth Century, Courage, Bravery, Heroism and Valor

Ninety-five Years of the Shenandoah Queens

I like the fact that they choose Queens from outside their region. Long may she reign!

First photo source: The Daily News Leader (Staunton, Virginia)10 Mar 1959, Tue Page 12







The home page.

Apparently, the Court also includes Apple Blossom Princesses.

Source: The Daily News Leader (Staunton, Virginia) 22 Mar 1957, Fri Page 3



Source of article: The Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia) 04 May 1957, Sat Page 3






Posted By: Paul - Fri Jun 24, 2022 - Comments (4)
Category: Agriculture, Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Parades and Festivals, Regionalism, Twentieth Century, Twenty-first Century

Mystery Illustration 107

What is it? Peat moss cubes for house plants? Insulation? Archaeological samples?

The answer is here.

Or after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jun 19, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Packaging, Wrapping, and other Protective Measures, Twentieth Century

Page 1 of 23 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›




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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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