Category:
Vegetables

Vegiforms

Back in the 1980s, Richard Tweddell III invented a way to grow vegetables into shapes such as faces, hearts, pop bottles, etc. by using plastic molds. As he wrote: "Just plant regular seeds in your garden, in the usual way. When the young vegetable forms, place it into the two part plastic mold and watch it grow to fill the mold. That's all there is to it."

I don't know why his invention never caught on. If I had a vegetable garden, I'd use them. But perhaps the idea of vegetables shaped like small human heads didn't appeal to enough people.

More info: archived vegiforms website, Tweddell's obituary, vegiform patent

Tweddell with a vegiform





Posted By: Alex - Tue Dec 12, 2023 - Comments (4)
Category: Horticulture and Gardens, Patents, Vegetables

Constipation and Political Unrest

I haven't been able to figure out what the title of the article referenced below was, since I can't find archived copies of Blackwood's magazine from the 1970s. The hypothesis, "that a fundamental cause of the violence... in Irish politics may well be constipation," is strange. It might make one wonder about the role of constipation in other conflicts around the world.

The Melbourne Age - Sep 30, 1976

Posted By: Alex - Fri Nov 17, 2023 - Comments (2)
Category: Violence, War, Vegetables, 1970s

American Vegetable Queen

Newsday - Aug 4, 1952



Tampa Tribune - Dec 2, 1952



Rochester Democrat and Chronicle - Aug 3, 1952

Posted By: Alex - Fri Oct 06, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Vegetables, 1950s

Turtle-Tater

Sheila Stiltner sure seemed fascinated by the turtle-tater.

Newport News Daily Press - Aug 8, 1964

Posted By: Alex - Mon Nov 14, 2022 - Comments (4)
Category: Vegetables, 1960s

Asparagus Divination

Jemima Packington divines the future by interpreting asparagus. She calls this the art of Asparamancer. She throws the asparagus in the air, and where they land tells her the future. Using this method, she claims to have correctly foreseen Brexit, Prince Philip's death, Theresa May's resignation, and the Queen's death.

The latest thing that the asparagus have told her: "King Charles will take a step back, due to his age, and make William Prince Regent."

More info: express.co.uk

Posted By: Alex - Sat Sep 24, 2022 - Comments (4)
Category: Predictions, Royalty, Vegetables

How to make a walking stick from cabbage

There's a type of cabbage that grows thick, woody stalks, and in the Channel Islands there's a tradition of making walking sticks out of it.

Instructions from Countryside Publications:

To get good straight stalks of the proper diameter for walking sticks you must strip off the lower leaves at regular intervals. If you get much wind, stake them. The plants are shallow-rooted, like corn, and are easily blown over. Purposely bending the young plants over and then later staking them straight will cause a natural crook in the stalk. This crook then becomes the handle to the walking stick. This type of stick is much prized in England, and fetches a better price than straight sticks.

If the leaves are left on too long the stalk becomes too thick for a proper walking stick and it will often branch out, trying to form limbs. Ideally, you need to remove the lower leaves when the stalk is slightly larger than walking stick size--about 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches in diameter. You can expect about 20 pecent shrinkage when dry. I think a diameter of about an inch is ideal for a walking stick...

The specific type of cabbage you need goes by a variety of names: 'cow cabbage,' 'Jersey cabbage,' or 'walking stick cabbage.' And yes, you can eat the leaves of this cabbage.

More info: wikipedia,

image source: Grow Your Own Monsters, by Nicola Davies and Simon Hickmott

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jul 09, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Vegetables

Tomato calls 911 for help

Adding this to the 'vegetables' category, despite the controversy over whether tomatoes are fruits or vegetables.

Miami Herald - Nov 10, 1990

Posted By: Alex - Wed Dec 15, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Vegetables, 1990s

The Patented Carrot Rectal Dilator

In 1927, the Canadian patent office granted an unusual patent (CA 259317) to George L. Kavanagh. It was unusual because, while most patents describe some new type of gadget or gizmo, Kavanagh's invention simply consisted of a method of using a carrot.

The problem Kavanagh had set out to solve was that of constipation in the elderly. The way he saw it, our rectums tend to grow more inelastic and shrunken as we age, and this leads to constipation. The solution, he concluded, was "gently dilating the anus and rectum until the organs are restored to their youthful size."

But what could be used as a dilator? Preferably something inexpensive and readily obtainable. That made him think of carrots.

A summary from his patent:


An added benefit of carrots, he noted, was that they come in a variety of different sizes. This would allow one to start with small carrots and work up to larger ones "until the desired result is obtained."

Unfortunately, Kavanagh submitted no drawings with his patent. But I did find a chart that provides a size comparison of different types of carrots, which could be potentially useful for anyone who wants to try out Kavanagh's method at home on an elderly relative.

image source: 123rf.com



Update: Kavanagh also got a US Patent (No. 1,525,505) for his invention.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Nov 24, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Health, Inventions, Patents, Vegetables, 1920s

Profit in Potato-Digging

Undated. I'm guessing it's late 19th Century. From OddBook.ca:

A small well-produced agricultural sales brochure for the Acme Potato Digging Attachment of the Potato Implement Co. of Traverse Mich.

Maybe I should give up this blogging gig and start digging potatoes!



Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 01, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Self-help Schemes, Books, Vegetables, Nineteenth Century

Death by carrot juice

It was probably the enormous quantities of Vitamin A pills that Basil Brown was taking which actually killed him. Though the daily gallon of carrot juice certainly contributed.

More info: NY Times

Ottawa Citizen - Feb 15, 1974

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jul 12, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Death, Vegetables, 1970s

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