Category:
Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience

The 1975 McDonald’s Puke-In

Oct 17, 1975: A group of protestors calling themselves the Radical Vegetarian League staged a "puke-in" at a McDonald's on the Ann Arbor campus of the University of Michigan. The protestors drank down a mixture of mustard and water, and then they vomited from the second-floor balcony of the restaurant onto the floor below. They said they were "protesting the poor quality of food served in places like this and the fact that fast food chains go into local communities and drive out small, independent restaurants."

Thanks to this story I learned that mustard water has been used as an emetic since ancient times.



Michigan Daily - Oct 18, 1975



Benton Harbor Herald-Palladium - Oct 18, 1975



The McDonald's at which the puke-in occurred. The building was torn down in 1995.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jun 13, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Restaurants, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, 1970s

The Straw Hat Riots of 1922

Allow me to quote at length from Wikipedia. But visit that page for even more details.

The Straw Hat Riot of 1922 was a riot that occurred in New York City at the end of summer as a result of unwritten rules in men's fashions at the time, and a tradition of taunting people who had failed to stop wearing straw hats after autumn began. Originating as a series of minor riots, it spread due to men wearing straw hats past the unofficial date that was deemed socially acceptable, September 15. It lasted eight days, leading to many arrests and some injuries.... By the early 20th century, straw boaters were considered acceptable day attire in North American cities at the height of summer even for businessmen, but there was an unwritten rule that one was not supposed to wear a straw hat past September 15 (which was known as "Felt Hat Day").[1] This date was arbitrary; earlier it had been September 1, but it eventually shifted to mid-month. It was socially acceptable for stockbrokers to destroy each other's hats, due to the fact that they were “companions”,[2] but it was not acceptable for total strangers. If any man was seen wearing a straw hat, he was, at minimum, subjecting himself to ridicule, and it was a tradition for youths to knock straw hats off wearers' heads and stomp on them.[3] This tradition became well established, and newspapers of the day would often warn people of the impending approach of the fifteenth, when men would have to switch to felt or silk hats.[4] Hat bashing was only socially acceptable after September 15, but there were multiple occasions leading up to this date where the police had to intervene and stop teenagers.[2] The riot itself began on September 13, 1922, two days before the supposed unspoken date, when a group of youths decided to get an early jump on the tradition.



Posted By: Paul - Tue Apr 02, 2024 - Comments (3)
Category: Customs, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, Headgear, 1920s, Pranks

Rachel Pinney, the Silent Doctor

In August 1961, Rachel Pinney took the following vow: "I intend to maintain silence on every Wednesday until my country formally renounces Nuclear Weapons. This silence is to be maintained non-violently in the face of any provocation."

Since Pinney worked as a medical doctor, her vow created some awkwardness with the patients she saw on Wednesdays. She had to communicate with them by means of nodding her head, hand signals, and notes (writing prescriptions).

According to her obituary, she maintained the vow for almost 30 years. Of course, the UK still has nuclear weapons.

Her once-a-week protest reminds me of Mildred Ruth Gordon who fasted every other day to show support for draft resisters.



Daily Mirror - Aug 10, 1961

Posted By: Alex - Wed Nov 29, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1960s

33-year strike

Jan 1961: After being on strike for 33 years, the barber shop boys of Copenhagen finally returned to work. By which time they were middle-aged men

Grimsby Evening Telegraph - Jan 5, 1961

Posted By: Alex - Fri Nov 10, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, 1960s

Bricks Thru Windows Don’t Open Doors

I am not sure how many rioters would be dissuaded by such a mild-mannered advertising campaign.





Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 23, 2023 - Comments (2)
Category: Noises and Other Public Disturbances of the Peace, PSA’s, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, Advertising, 1960s

The North Dakota Zap-In, 1969

May 1969: Responding to a suggestion in the North Dakota State University paper that students "Zip to Zap" to stage a "Zap-In" in Zap, North Dakota (population: 300), 3000 young people descended on the town. The Zap-In soon descended into chaos, prompting the mayor to summon the National Guard to remove the students.

According to wikipedia, the event was "the only official riot in the history of North Dakota that was put down by the National Guard."

More info: Minot Daily News

Bismarck Tribune - May 10, 1969



Bismarck Tribune - Aug 7, 1969



Students gather around the bonfire built in the middle of Zap's Main Street
source: North Dakota Digital Horizons



The National Guard in Zap
source: North Dakota Historical Society

Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 17, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Dinners, Banquets, Parties, Tributes, Roasts and Other Celebrations, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, 1960s

The College Stripper Riot of 1955

The history of monkey-wrenching university protocols did not begin in the 1960s.










Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 05, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Education, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, Burlesque, Exotic Dancing, Stripping and Other Forms of Staged Nakedness, 1950s, Pranks

“Goodbye, Three Mile Island”

With Chernobyl in the news again, perhaps we need to revive this song.



Gary and the Outriders, a local music group, recorded an original song, "Goodbye T.M.I. (The Ballad of Three Mile Island)," and released it as a 45 rpm record. Its catchy melody contrasts with its dire refrain: "Goodbye, goodbye to your life, T.M.I."

Posted By: Paul - Tue Apr 19, 2022 - Comments (4)
Category: Music, Regionalism, Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1970s

The Tight Pants Strike of 1966

The media called it the Tight Pants Strike. Also, the Battle of the Bulge.

In 1966, 35-year-old Pat Morris was working at International Paper’s plywood plant in Oregon when management suspended her on account of her tight-fitting pants, complaining that they were too distracting for male workers. Morris protested that other female workers were also wearing tight jeans. Nevertheless, according to her, “They said something about being too stacked and sent me home.” (Almost every paper in the country felt obliged to report that her measurements were 39-27-39.)

Even though she wasn’t in the union, the 315 union members at the plant promptly went on strike in protest, claiming that the suspension was illegal. The strike lasted a week, until Morris was allowed back to her job, wearing looser jeans.

(left) Cincinnati Enquirer - Aug 26, 1966; (right) Esquire - Jan 1967



New York Daily News - Sep 4, 1966



Redlands Daily Facts - Aug 31, 1966



Binghamton Press and Sun Bulletin - Sep 1, 1966

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jan 21, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Riots, Protests and Civil Disobedience, Tradesmen, Manual Laborers, and Skilled Workers, 1960s

Page 1 of 3 pages  1 2 3 > 




weird universe thumbnail
Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Contact Us
Monthly Archives
June 2024 •  May 2024 •  April 2024 •  March 2024 •  February 2024 •  January 2024

December 2023 •  November 2023 •  October 2023 •  September 2023 •  August 2023 •  July 2023 •  June 2023 •  May 2023 •  April 2023 •  March 2023 •  February 2023 •  January 2023

December 2022 •  November 2022 •  October 2022 •  September 2022 •  August 2022 •  July 2022 •  June 2022 •  May 2022 •  April 2022 •  March 2022 •  February 2022 •  January 2022

December 2021 •  November 2021 •  October 2021 •  September 2021 •  August 2021 •  July 2021 •  June 2021 •  May 2021 •  April 2021 •  March 2021 •  February 2021 •  January 2021

December 2020 •  November 2020 •  October 2020 •  September 2020 •  August 2020 •  July 2020 •  June 2020 •  May 2020 •  April 2020 •  March 2020 •  February 2020 •  January 2020

December 2019 •  November 2019 •  October 2019 •  September 2019 •  August 2019 •  July 2019 •  June 2019 •  May 2019 •  April 2019 •  March 2019 •  February 2019 •  January 2019

December 2018 •  November 2018 •  October 2018 •  September 2018 •  August 2018 •  July 2018 •  June 2018 •  May 2018 •  April 2018 •  March 2018 •  February 2018 •  January 2018

December 2017 •  November 2017 •  October 2017 •  September 2017 •  August 2017 •  July 2017 •  June 2017 •  May 2017 •  April 2017 •  March 2017 •  February 2017 •  January 2017

December 2016 •  November 2016 •  October 2016 •  September 2016 •  August 2016 •  July 2016 •  June 2016 •  May 2016 •  April 2016 •  March 2016 •  February 2016 •  January 2016

December 2015 •  November 2015 •  October 2015 •  September 2015 •  August 2015 •  July 2015 •  June 2015 •  May 2015 •  April 2015 •  March 2015 •  February 2015 •  January 2015

December 2014 •  November 2014 •  October 2014 •  September 2014 •  August 2014 •  July 2014 •  June 2014 •  May 2014 •  April 2014 •  March 2014 •  February 2014 •  January 2014

December 2013 •  November 2013 •  October 2013 •  September 2013 •  August 2013 •  July 2013 •  June 2013 •  May 2013 •  April 2013 •  March 2013 •  February 2013 •  January 2013

December 2012 •  November 2012 •  October 2012 •  September 2012 •  August 2012 •  July 2012 •  June 2012 •  May 2012 •  April 2012 •  March 2012 •  February 2012 •  January 2012

December 2011 •  November 2011 •  October 2011 •  September 2011 •  August 2011 •  July 2011 •  June 2011 •  May 2011 •  April 2011 •  March 2011 •  February 2011 •  January 2011

December 2010 •  November 2010 •  October 2010 •  September 2010 •  August 2010 •  July 2010 •  June 2010 •  May 2010 •  April 2010 •  March 2010 •  February 2010 •  January 2010

December 2009 •  November 2009 •  October 2009 •  September 2009 •  August 2009 •  July 2009 •  June 2009 •  May 2009 •  April 2009 •  March 2009 •  February 2009 •  January 2009

December 2008 •  November 2008 •  October 2008 •  September 2008 •  August 2008 •  July 2008 •