Category:
Predictions

By 2531 everyone in Japan will be named Sato

Japanese demographics professor Hiroshi Yoshida has warned that by 2531 everyone in Japan will have the last name 'Sato'.

Why? Because a) Sato is the most common last name in Japan, and b) Japanese law requires that married couples use the same last name. Because Japanese women almost always take their husband's name, this means that the surname 'Sato' is slowly crowding out all other names.

From the Guardian:

According to Yoshida’s calculations, the proportion of Japanese named Sato increased 1.0083 times from 2022 to 2023. Assuming the rate remains constant and there is no change to the law on surnames, around half of the Japanese population will have that name in 2446, rising to 100% in 2531.

The Think Name Project is promoting Professor Yoshida's research as a way to gain support for ending Japan's law requiring couples to have the same surname.

More info: spoon-tamago.com/

Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 04, 2024 - Comments (3)
Category: Odd Names, Predictions, Science, Asia

A Death Foretold

Malkeet Singh predicted that he would die on Sunday, April 8, 1984 at exactly 10am. Then he would be reincarnated as a 1400-year-old faith healer. Dozens of people turned up to witness the event, but nothing happened. So Singh told the crowd to come back after lunch. Still, nothing happened. The next day Singh returned to work at the local Ford factory.

Coventry Evening Telegraph - Apr 9, 1984

Posted By: Alex - Mon Feb 26, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Death, Predictions, 1980s

1999:  Our Hopeful Future

Like most predictive non-fiction, this 1956 volume has both hits and misses throughout. But I was amazed by one page, which predicts flatscreen TVs, a Roomba, and household surveillance cameras, bing-bang-boom!


Read the whole thing here.




Posted By: Paul - Sun Oct 01, 2023 - Comments (3)
Category: Predictions, Yesterday’s Tomorrows, Books, 1950s

Cheese Fortune Telling

Add cheese fortune telling (or "tyromancy" as it's called) to the other techniques of using food to predict the future that we've previously posted about (asparagus divination and apple-peel divination).



Some info from BackyardBanshee.com:

The word Tyromancy stems from the Greek words turos (tryro) meaning cheese and manteia (mancy) meaning divination. The history of the practice goes back to around the middle ages, and just like any other form of divination, the art of Tyromancy assists in divining messages. This particular method does so through the coagulation, fermentation or patterns of cheese.

In the middle ages, cheese would be inspected and based on the shape, the number of holes, patterns of mould and other cheesy characteristics one could predict certain things, including rain, love, money, justice, health and death.

One medieval method offered various potential outcomes, with each piece of cheese denoting one path. Depending on which piece was eaten first by a mouse, or a worm, you could see which path was more likely, which links nicely to Myomancy (mice divination).

Another traditional approach was used by young country girls to divine the names of their future husbands. You could write the names of your potential sweethearts on individual pieces of cheese, and the first to grow mould would show the most likely suitor or ideal match.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Sep 07, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Food, Predictions

Bad perm caused loss of psychic powers

Oct 1950: Jacqueline Sisson sued her hairdresser for $20,000, alleging that scalp burns she suffered while getting a permanent wave caused her to lose the psychic powers she relied upon for her stage act. Specifically, she had lost the ability to know what musical tunes audience members were thinking of.

As is typical of stories like this, the media never ran a follow-up to report the outcome of her lawsuit.



Los Angeles Times - Oct 12, 1950

Posted By: Alex - Sun May 21, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Paranormal, Predictions, Lawsuits, 1950s

ESP Girl

In November 1964, 5-year-old Kenneth Mason went missing. The police searched the river where he was last seen, but failed to find him.

Then 15-year-old Linda Anderson came forward and offered to use her psychic powers to help the police find Kenneth. Her father put her in a hypnotic trance, to activate her powers, and she declared, "The boy is not in the river, but is in a house." So the police began searching houses in the area.

Charlotte Observer - Nov 14, 1964



Linda Anderson, ESP Girl



In addition to being able to locate missing children, Linda also claimed to have the power of "dermal optical perception." She could read through her skin (as opposed to through her eyes). The media dubbed her "ESP Girl."

Lewiston Daily Sun - Nov 14, 1964



A skeptical physics professor, James A. Coleman, doubted that she could see through her skin and challenged her to prove it.

Bangor Daily News - Feb 11, 1965



She lost the challenge.

Nashua Telegraph - Feb 15, 1965



And then Kenneth Mason was found. Sadly he was dead and in the river after all. So much for the powers of ESP Girl.

Daily Kennebec Journal - Mar 12, 1965

Posted By: Alex - Tue Apr 04, 2023 - Comments (2)
Category: Crime, Paranormal, Predictions, 1960s

The automobile of the future

From the Washington Times - Jan 6, 1918:



Compare this to the Zoox, the self-driving robotaxi that Amazon is developing. Not an exact match, but similar enough that I'm going to call the 1918 prediction a success.

Though note that the 1918 car still had a driver. So the future managed to outdo what the futurists of 1918 imagined.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Apr 02, 2023 - Comments (5)
Category: Predictions, Yesterday’s Tomorrows, 1910s, Cars

The Foreshadowed Death of Gloria Dickson

In 1943, actress Gloria Dickson had a sizable part in THE CRIME DOCTOR'S STRANGEST CASE.

The scene to focus on starts below at 44:23. Gloria is married to a man who's very careless with matches, even starting fires in bed. She remarks that she's been "almost cremated."

Two years later, Dickson would die in a domestic fire in her bedroom, apparently started by a stray match.

Newspaper clip source: Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, Texas) 11 Apr 1945, Wed Page 3



Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 16, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Death, Domestic, Fate, Predetermination and Inevitability, Hollywood, Predictions, 1940s

Psychic Ernesto Montgomery

Psychic Ernesto Montgomery claimed to have predicted many events (the assassination of JFK, the death of Princess Diana, various airplane crashes, etc.), but for some reason the authorities that he insisted he had contacted beforehand could later never remember having heard from him.

Predictions are standard fare for psychics. But what really set Montgomery apart was the highly unique source of his psychic powers:

"I was born with two appendages below both ears," he explained. "They are like little bones, maybe 1/16th of an inch or so but when I am about to pick up psychic vibrations about the future, they shoot out to a length of 2 or 3 inches.

"Think of your TV antenna," he said.

Unfortunately I couldn't find any photo of his "appendages".

More info: pathtotruth.com

Chicago Tribune - June 1, 1979

Posted By: Alex - Tue Dec 13, 2022 - Comments (0)
Category: Human Marvels, Predictions

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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