Category:
Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings

Buckeye Beer

The revitalized company still exists today, but no mention of reinstating their "mascots," Buck and Billy.

Read the history here.





Posted By: Paul - Fri May 14, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Human Marvels, Regionalism, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, Alcohol

Little Mr. Tritium

The Japanese government recently created an animated character that definitely belongs in our ongoing series of strange spokesbeings. It was a "cute fish-like creature with rosy cheeks" that was intended to represent a radioactive hydrogen isotope. The government was hoping that this creature would help gain public support for its plan of releasing contaminated water from Fukushima into the sea.

While the government didn't give this creature a name, people have been calling it "Little Mr. Tritium".

More info: The Guardian



Posted By: Alex - Tue Apr 27, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Government, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters

Mary Mild

Disney released Mary Poppins in 1964. The next year Ivory Liquid Soap debuted a new mascot: Mary Mild, a flying maid. Seems like an obvious Mary Poppins rip-off to me, though I can't find the similarity mentioned anywhere.

Mary Mild didn't last long. Within two years, Ivory had canned her.

The ads below ran in 1966 in magazines such as Ladies Home Journal and Good Housekeeping.





Posted By: Alex - Mon Jan 18, 2021 - Comments (5)
Category: Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1960s

Corkhill Meat Loaf Monster

Was Corkhill's spokes-creature supposed to be a snowman, or some kind of living, talking meatloaf? The body seems all wrong for a snowman. So I have a suspicion it was a meatloaf monster.

Wilmington News Journal - Aug 4, 1939

Posted By: Alex - Fri Nov 13, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, 1930s

Follies of the Madmen #492

Is Miss Fixit a nurse or a child--or both? I'm confused....



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Nov 01, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Hygiene, 1950s, Love & Romance

Follies of the Madmen #486

Just a sample of the horrors you'll see after you drink enough of our booze.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Sep 04, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Animals, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination, Horror, 1950s, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #478



The horrifying Hotpoint Corporate Spokesbeing, with a giant Hotpoint logo wedged into its brain, appears to a mother and child.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jun 01, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Aliens, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Domestic, Surrealism, 1940s, Brain Damage

Follies of the Madmen #477



Our cigarettes are enjoyed by problematical outcasts and outsiders.

Source of ad.

Posted By: Paul - Mon May 25, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Ethnic Groupings, Stereotypes and Cliches, Tobacco and Smoking, 1960s

Citrus & Vegetable Magazine

I cannot find an issue of C&V later than 2014, and the website you see on the cover below seems down. But certainly, if they still exist, they will find it hard to beat the cover for the April 1977 issue.



Posted By: Paul - Sat May 16, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Agriculture, Business, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Magazines

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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