Category:
United Kingdom

Unlikely Reasons for Murder No. 18


Posted By: Paul - Sat Jun 15, 2024 - Comments (2)
Category: Death, Europe, United Kingdom, Nineteenth Century

Thrillington

There have been numerous occasions of artists hiding their involvement with their own work. Not just using a pseudonym, but actively encouraging a hoax. Here's one such. From the album's Wikipedia page:

Thrillington is an album produced by English musician Paul McCartney, under the pseudonym Percy "Thrills" Thrillington.... [In] late 1976, McCartney decided to release the long-in-storage project, and devised a plan to publicize the album while obscuring his own involvement with it. In preparation for the release of Thrillington, McCartney invented the fictitious socialite Percy Thrillington, and even took out ads in various UK music papers announcing Thrillington's so-called comings and goings to generate curiosity and interest.

Released in April 1977, McCartney's name was mentioned only in the main liner notes where he is described as a friend of Percy. Thrillington went mostly unnoticed upon its release although it was reviewed by Rolling Stone magazine and mentioned in the "Random Notes" section.[5] Variety also reviewed the album, noting that "Whether Percy Thrillington is Paul McCartney or not is really irrelevant. What matters is that he (they) is (are) having fun."[6]


Listen to the other tracks at the link.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jun 05, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Hoaxes and Imposters and Imitators, Music, 1970s, United Kingdom

Hampstead Beatnik Party

This clip (only static for a soundtrack) from British Pathe is labeled "Beatnik Party (1960) Hampstead." But is it the same party described in the article?



Posted By: Paul - Sun Apr 28, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Dinners, Banquets, Parties, Tributes, Roasts and Other Celebrations, Police and Other Law Enforcement, Bohemians, Beatniks, Hippies and Slackers, 1960s, United Kingdom

Weird Easter Hats

The strange hats appear about halfway thru.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Mar 15, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Holidays, Easter, Headgear, 1950s, United Kingdom

Easter Lifting and Heaving

Easter is early this year: March 31st. So you'd better bone up quick on the old practice of lifting strangers up in chairs.

According to Hone, the practice was common in Lancashire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire and other parts of England. Groups of people would gather together in the street and physically lift those they came across into the air, expecting a financial reward in return. Hone describes the practice as differing slightly in different parts of the country:

In some parts the person is laid horizontally, in others placed in a sitting position on the bearers’ hands. Usually, when the lifting or heaving is within doors, a chair is produced, but in all cases the ceremony is incomplete without three distinct elevations. (SCM 03706, p. 426)

In Warwickshire, Easter Monday and Easter Tuesday were known as ‘heaving-day‘, because on the Monday it was the tradition for men to ‘heave and kiss the women’ and on the Tuesday for the women to do the same to the men. Hone viewed the practice as, ‘an absurd performance of the resurrection’ derived from the Catholic church.











Posted By: Paul - Tue Feb 06, 2024 - Comments (3)
Category: Furniture, Holidays, Easter, Regionalism, Foreign Customs, United Kingdom

Promoting English Wine

Aug 1985: Four British ex-servicemen, all missing both their legs, embarked on a tour of France to promote English wines. Their motto: "You don't have to be legless to enjoy English wine."

Some explanation may be needed for Americans. 'Legless' is British slang for 'very drunk.'

London Daily Telegraph - Aug 10, 1985

Posted By: Alex - Mon Feb 05, 2024 - Comments (3)
Category: Inebriation and Intoxicants, 1980s, United Kingdom, Legs

Merry Christmas 1945

What ever happened to NYC's Xmas Parade? Also: a slightly weird beauty contest.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Dec 17, 2023 - Comments (0)
Category: Holidays, Parades and Festivals, Theater and Stage, North America, United Kingdom

Back on Gas

Mrs. Edith Slack waited twenty years to ask the Gas Board to reconnect her gas cooker which its workers had accidentally left disconnected. She didn't ask sooner because her husband "didn't like making a fuss."

As Pink Floyd said, "Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way."

London Sunday Mirror- July 5, 1959

Posted By: Alex - Tue Nov 14, 2023 - Comments (2)
Category: Utilities, United Kingdom

Tri-Ang Bolo Game

The Tri-Ang Toy company in the UK seems to have been a conventional and successful business. But then, in some fit of madness, they chose to release "Bolo--The New Game."





Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 11, 2023 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions, Really Bad Ideas, Success & Failure, Toys, 1940s, United Kingdom

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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