Weird Universe Archive

January 2018

January 31, 2018

Michelin Hour

The short-lived Michelin Hour radio show, 1928, in which an orchestra of men dressed as tires played popular numbers and lighter classics.



Detroit Free Press - Apr 8, 1928

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jan 31, 2018 - Comments (6)
Category: Radio, 1920s

January 30, 2018

Operation Decoy

In August 1962, New York City cops began patrolling the streets at night while dressed as women. The idea was to trap would-be muggers.

But not all the decoy cops were successful at apprehending the muggers. Patrolman Victor Ortiz got hit over the head by a mugger, lost his gun, and his assailant got away.

Update: Author Erika Janik discusses Operation Decoy in her book Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction. She places it within the context of an ongoing resistance within the police department during the mid-twentieth century to the idea of having female police officers:

By the 1960s, this attitude had become entrenched in police administration and law enforcement literature. Police Juvenile Enforcement declared that while a policewoman could be an asset, "a female officer is not a necessity."
Some even went so far as to suggest that male officers could simply dress as women for undercover work. In 1962, eight male officers did just that in order to trap muggers and rapists in New York City. "We want our men to look like housewives, not like Hollywood stars," explained Inspector Michael Codd, head of the tctical force. Twenty-seven-year-old patrolman Victor Ortiz wore white sandals, orange tapered pants, and a beige padded sweater on top of a bright print blouse. On hand to help the officers get ready were two policewomen, Caryl Collins and Dolores Munroe. The women stood by in their official uniforms as the men posed for the TV and newspaper cameras. Why teaching men to wear heels and put on lipstick was deemed more useful than simply deploying policewomen seems a question the reporters never asked. It's true that decoys did get attacked as part of these operations (that was the point), but all officers worked in teams with detectives standing by to apprehend suspects. In this instance, two of the disguised policemen had their purses snatched in Central Park and seven people were arrested in the overnight anti-mugging operation.


Orlando Evening Star - Aug 25, 1962



Greenville News - Aug 24, 1962



Allentown Morning Call - Aug 28, 1962



Posted By: Alex - Tue Jan 30, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Police and Other Law Enforcement, Gender, 1960s

Zhu Bajie, Enlightened Pig Hero



Buddhism is full of weird characters. I thought I knew most of them, but only just encountered Zhu Bajie.

Get your $400 statue here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 30, 2018 - Comments (5)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Antisocial Activites, Religion, Statues and Monuments, Asia

January 29, 2018

Swallowed the evidence

In November 1965, Walter Cunningham was arrested on suspicion of being involved in a jewel robbery. The police picked him up two days after the robbery, loitering outside a pawn shop. He didn't have the jewels on him, but when he later complained of a stomach ache, the police realized he had swallowed all the evidence: about 91 diamonds, a 20-karat ruby, and an emerald chip.

Police Lt. Carl Schumacher told reporters, "We figure he must have swallowed the gems while he was being booked. He was probably standing there chomping away while our backs were turned."

Doctors subsequently recovered the jewels. Cunningham pleaded guilty to a federal charge of interstate transportation of stolen property.

Santa Rosa Press Democrat - Nov 19, 1965

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jan 29, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Crime, 1960s

8 Dance Crazes

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jan 29, 2018 - Comments (0)
Category: Fads, Dance, Twentieth Century

January 28, 2018

Women are teachable

A guide published by the Radio Corporation of America circa 1943.









Source: imgur via reddit.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jan 28, 2018 - Comments (6)
Category: Jobs and Occupations, Gender, Women, 1940s

Mystery Gadget 56



This device does what now?

Answer is here.

And after the jump,

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jan 28, 2018 - Comments (4)
Category: Technology, 1930s

January 27, 2018

Truth Dollars

The mid-1950s fundraising campaign for Radio Free Europe:

"Every dollar buys 100 words of truth..."

So if you don't give anything it's all gonna be lies!

Posted By: Alex - Sat Jan 27, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Money, 1950s

THE TRIP



We hope you make it back!

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jan 27, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Drugs, Psychedelic, Movies, Music, Pop Art, Surrealism, Bohemians, Beatniks, Hippies and Slackers, 1960s

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

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