Weird Universe Archive

April 2021

April 5, 2021

Manly Bosoms Indecent

1934: Coney Island police continued to crack down on male bathers who adopted the new fashion of topless bathing suits.

As for the female bathers:

Asked specifically about the fashionable trunk and brassiere top for ladies, the Coney Island lieutenant dropped the receiver, and apparently sought information from one of his assistants. He came back with the answer that he did not know what a brassiere is.
"But if it's indecent we won't allow it," he said.


Windsor Star - May 15, 1934

Posted By: Alex - Mon Apr 05, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Censorship, Bluenoses, Taboos, Prohibitions and Other Cultural No-No’s, Fashion, Swimming, Snorkeling, and Diving, 1930s

The Kiddie-Koop




Children in cages!

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Apr 05, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Babies, Domestic, Inventions, Chindogu, Advertising, 1950s

April 4, 2021

Fire-Breathing Woman

In April 1940, Linda Lancaster Dodge Stratton was granted a patent for the "cigar or cigarette lighter" shown below. Its novel feature was that it was shaped like a fire-breathing woman. Or, as Stratton put it, "in the shape of a human figure artistically posed with the igniting means located in the mouth and ignited and extinguished by the movement of the head to open and close the mouth thereof through the manual movement of the arms toward and from the mouth."

It kinda looks like a fire-breathing Barbie. Though it predates Barbie by almost 20 years.

The patent said this woman was to be "constructed in a pocket or a table size." It would definitely be a conversation piece to have a table-size version of her in your home.



Posted By: Alex - Sun Apr 04, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Inventions, Patents, Smoking and Tobacco, 1940s, Women

Liquid Dividends

What else could you do with your inventory on the eve of Prohibition?



Source: Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, Massachusetts) 14 Jan 1920, Wed Page 7

Posted By: Paul - Sun Apr 04, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Censorship, Bluenoses, Taboos, Prohibitions and Other Cultural No-No’s, Freebies, Come-ons and Loss Leaders, 1920s, Alcohol

April 3, 2021

Dodge La Femme

1955: Chrysler introduced the Dodge La Femme, a two-door, pink-and-white sedan "for the discriminating modern woman".

source: DodgeLaFemme.com



In an attempt to make the car irresistible to women, Dodge also threw in a pink leather handbag that contained "cigarette lighter and case, compact, lipstick and other feminine items covered in matching pink leather." Plus, "a vinyl raincoat and stylish sou'wester hat, printed in the same pink shade and pattern as the Jacquard upholstery." And a matching pink umbrella!

But even with all this, the car failed to appeal to consumers. However, because fewer than 2500 of them were ever made, the car is now sought after by collectors.

More info: wikipedia

St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Apr 10, 1955

Posted By: Alex - Sat Apr 03, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Gender, Women, 1950s, Cars

April 2, 2021

Spray-Paints face as a disguise

2009: in order to disguise himself while robbing a phone store, Thomas James spray-painted his face gold. He later began having trouble breathing and died.

It's not clear to me if he actually died because of the spray paint, though it must have been a contributing factor. His accomplice, who also spray-painted his face, was apparently fine.

Either way, spray-painting your face doesn't seem like much of a disguise. It reminds me of those guys who tried to conceal themselves from surveillance cameras by rubbing lemon juice all over their faces.

source: wistv.com

Posted By: Alex - Fri Apr 02, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Stupid Criminals

Bock Beer Ads

The fact that Bock Beer allowed in the German language for a pun with "goat" (bock) meant that the drink had a handy visual icon as symbol. But since goats had an alliance with Pan and Satan, many of these ads seem in my eyes to have lewd and devilish connotations. Also fitting for drunkenness, I guess.

See more ads here.







Posted By: Paul - Fri Apr 02, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Gods, Religion, Advertising, Europe, Nineteenth Century, Alcohol

April 1, 2021

Profit in Potato-Digging

Undated. I'm guessing it's late 19th Century. From OddBook.ca:

A small well-produced agricultural sales brochure for the Acme Potato Digging Attachment of the Potato Implement Co. of Traverse Mich.

Maybe I should give up this blogging gig and start digging potatoes!



Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 01, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Self-help Schemes, Books, Vegetables, Nineteenth Century

Mystery Illustration 99

What fairly high-tech product--for 1911--would require such a vast factory?




Answer after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Thu Apr 01, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Architecture, Buildings and Other Structures, Technology, 1910s

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