Category:
1940s

16 Old Ladies Locked in the Lavatory






The artist.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Aug 13, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Humor, Hygiene, Excrement, Music, 1940s

Miss Beverly Hills 1960

In our continuing annals of oddball beauty contests, this 1948 event must qualify as exceptional.





Newspaper coverage here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Aug 12, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Contests, Races and Other Competitions, Children, 1940s

Mystery Illustration 53



What is the pretext for this display?

The answer is here.

And after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 07, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Guns, 1940s

Ada Leonard and Her All-Girl Orchestra






Wikipedia page here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Aug 05, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Music, Gender, Women, 1940s

Zippo Car

The Zippo Manufacturing Co. built the Zippo car in 1947 by adapting a Chrysler Saratoga. However, the weight of the lighters kept causing the tires to blow out. So in 1952 the car was sent to a Pittsburgh garage for repairs and re-adaptation. It was never seen again. To this day, no one knows what happened to the Zippo car.

It reminds me of the tale of the lost Star Wars Celica GT.





In 1998, a replica Zippo car was built — fitted with modern tires that could handle the weight.



More info: post-gazette.com, NY Daily News, Zippo.

Thanks to hotsauce269 for the photo!

Posted By: Alex - Fri Aug 04, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Motor Vehicles, Cars, 1940s

The Giant Leg Sign for Nylons



Source of foto.



Source of foto.

Judge the likeness for yourself.



Her Wikipedia page.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Aug 01, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Body, Movies, Regionalism, Advertising, Giant People in Ads, 1940s

Mystery Illustration 52



What is the secret technique behind this drawing?

The answer is here.

And after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jul 31, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Art, 1940s

Road Roller Endorsed by Doris Day

An odd example of a movie cross promotion from 1949. Perhaps fans of Doris Day would also be interested in her favorite road roller!



I'm not entirely sure if this ad belongs here or on the Museum of Hoaxes, because there's some odd things about it. For a start, what is this magazine Asphalt & Macadam Monthly that the ad supposedly appeared in? This ad is the one and only reference to such a magazine that I can find. And did International Harvester ever produce a De Luxe Series 56 roller-compactor? Again, this ad is the only reference to it I can find.

However, print copies of the ad appear to be for sale, which would be odd if it was a fake ad someone had photoshopped together.

But it's possible it was a fake ad produced in 1949. The movie the ad mentions, It's a Great Feeling, was (according to Wikipedia) a "spoof of what goes on behind the scenes in Hollywood movie making." So maybe a ridiculous/fake cross-promotion was part of the marketing for the movie?


More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jul 28, 2017 - Comments (15)
Category: Movies, Advertising, 1940s

The Florida Trio






Source.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 22, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Entertainment, 1940s, 1950s

The Maid of Cotton Pageant

Continuing our intermittent look at oddball beauty pageants.

The Maid of Cotton pageant began in 1939. The annual pageant was sponsored by the National Cotton Council (NCC), Memphis Cotton Carnival, and the Cotton Exchanges of Memphis, New York, and New Orleans. The pageant was held in Memphis, Tennessee, in conjunction with the Carnival until the 1980s.

In mid-December every year the NCC released a list of contestants. Contestants were required to have been born in one of the cotton-producing states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North and South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas or Virginia. They might have also been born in the cotton-producing counties of Alexander, Jefferson, Massac, Pulaski, Williamson or Madison, Illinois or in Clark or Nye counties of Nevada. There were usually twenty contestants each year.

Contestants were judged on personality, good manners, intelligence, and family background as well as beauty and an ability to model. A Top Ten were chosen and then a Top Five, and finally second and first runners up and a winner. Winners served as goodwill and fashion ambassadors of the cotton industry in a five-month, all-expense tour of American cities. In the mid-1950s the tour expanded globally. In the late 1950s a Little Miss Cotton pageant was begun but lasted only until 1963 before being discontinued. In the mid-1980s Dallas,Texas took over the pageant, in conjunction with the NCC and its overseas division, Cotton Council International. In 1986, to bolster interest and participation, the NCC eliminated the rule requiring contestants to be born in a cotton-producing state. The pageant was discontinued in 1993, one of the reasons being that Cotton Inc. stopped contributing scholarship money as well as waning public interest and changing marketing strategies.


More details here.

And also here.

The 1952 winner.

Source.



Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 21, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Contests, Races and Other Competitions, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s

Page 1 of 42 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›



Get WU Posts by Email

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner




weird universe thumbnail
Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Chuck Shepherd
Chuck is the purveyor of News of the Weird, the syndicated column which for decades has set the gold-standard for reporting on oddities and the bizarre.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

Contact Us
Monthly Archives
August 2017 •  July 2017 •  June 2017 •  May 2017 •  April 2017 •  March 2017 •  February 2017 •  January 2017

December 2016 •  November 2016 •  October 2016 •  September 2016 •  August 2016 •  July 2016 •  June 2016 •  May 2016 •  April 2016 •  March 2016 •  February 2016 •  January 2016

December 2015 •  November 2015 •  October 2015 •  September 2015 •  August 2015 •  July 2015 •  June 2015 •  May 2015 •  April 2015 •  March 2015 •  February 2015 •  January 2015

December 2014 •  November 2014 •  October 2014 •  September 2014 •  August 2014 •  July 2014 •  June 2014 •  May 2014 •  April 2014 •  March 2014 •  February 2014 •  January 2014

December 2013 •  November 2013 •  October 2013 •  September 2013 •  August 2013 •  July 2013 •  June 2013 •  May 2013 •  April 2013 •  March 2013 •  February 2013 •  January 2013

December 2012 •  November 2012 •  October 2012 •  September 2012 •  August 2012 •  July 2012 •  June 2012 •  May 2012 •  April 2012 •  March 2012 •  February 2012 •  January 2012

December 2011 •  November 2011 •  October 2011 •  September 2011 •  August 2011 •  July 2011 •  June 2011 •  May 2011 •  April 2011 •  March 2011 •  February 2011 •  January 2011

December 2010 •  November 2010 •  October 2010 •  September 2010 •  August 2010 •  July 2010 •  June 2010 •  May 2010 •  April 2010 •  March 2010 •  February 2010 •  January 2010

December 2009 •  November 2009 •  October 2009 •  September 2009 •  August 2009 •  July 2009 •  June 2009 •  May 2009 •  April 2009 •  March 2009 •  February 2009 •  January 2009

December 2008 •  November 2008 •  October 2008 •  September 2008 •  August 2008 •  July 2008 •