Category:
1940s

Ex-Lax Movies

An 'Ex-Lax Movie' doesn't sound like something I'd want to watch. Actually, it's something I'd actively avoid. And I can't imagine the phrase sounded much better back in 1939 and '40 when Ex-Lax ran these ads in magazines such as Life and Woman's Home Companion.

"The girl who punished herself"

Betty: I don't know which is worse... constipation or the remedy!
Sally: You're silly to punish yourself that way. Why don't you try Ex-Lax?

Betty: Ex-Lax? You expect that to work for me... a little chocolate tablet?
Sally: Don't let its pleasant taste deceive you. Ex-Lax is a dependable laxative—thorough and effective!

LATER
Betty: No more strong, bad-tasting laxatives for me! That Ex-Lax was just the thing. It fixed me up fine!
Sally: What did I tell you! We've used Ex-Lax in our family for over 30 years.


The Awakening of "Mr. A."

Mr. A: Whew! I hate the very thought of having to take a cathartic.
Mr. B: You wouldn't if you'd try Ex-Lax. It tastes swell—just like chocolate.

Mr. A: Ex-Lax? That's what we give the youngsters. What I need is dynamite!
Mr. B: Don't kid yourself! Ex-Lax is plenty effective, if that's what's worrying you!

LATER
Mr. A: Boy, I feel like a million this morning! That Ex-Lax sure is great stuff!
Mr. B: You said it, pal! We've been using Ex-Lax in our family for more than thirty years!


"Mr. Wright found out he was wrong!"

Mr. Wright: Gee, Honey, this stuff is awful! Why do all laxatives taste so bad?
Mrs. Wright: All of them don't. Ex-Lax tastes like delicious chocolate.

Mr. Wright: Ex-Lax! That's all right for you and Junior, but I need something stronger!
Mrs. Wright: No you don't! Ex-Lax is as effective as any bad-tasting cathartic.

LATER
Mr. Wright: I sure am glad I took your advice. It's Ex-Lax for me from now on.
Mrs. Wright: Yes, with Ex-Lax in the medicine chest we don't need any other laxative!

Posted By: Alex - Fri Dec 06, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Advertising, Excrement, 1940s

Prices Unlimited

Greedy, unpatriotic girls receive a visit from the Ghost of Meat Rationing Present.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 30, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, PSA’s, Public Humiliation, War, 1940s

Bewitched by a sandwich

Compelling excuse. Back in 1947, when police apprehended 18-year-old Raymond Adame as he was attempting to kidnap Celina Jarmillo, he explained, "Last April she made me a sandwich of potatoes, beans, and macaroni, and according to our legend she bewitched me... I couldn't get out of her spell."

Vancouver Sun - Nov 7, 1947



Celina Jarmillo



Raymond Adame
source: Los Angeles Public Library



A follow-up report, from January 1948, noted that Adame was, in the end, only charged with assault rather than kidnapping. And it revealed that the bewitching sandwich had also included "fish eyes".

Does that literally mean eyes from fish, or is "fish eyes" a term for some less disgusting type of food?

Arizona Daily Star - Jan 9, 1948

Posted By: Alex - Fri Nov 29, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Crime, Food, 1940s

Follies of the Madmen #453

The wealthy always employ midgets to help them dress. Seriously, what size is that person standing on the chair? Maybe the gal in undergarments is a giant?



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Nov 18, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Ambiguity, Uncertainty and Deliberate Obscurity, Business, Advertising, Confusion, Misunderstanding, and Incomprehension, Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Surrealism, Underwear, 1940s

Right and Wrong in Fashion



"Street Fashion Critic:" good excuse to ogle women.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Nov 16, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Experts and Authority Figures, Fashion, 1940s

The Malibu Remuda of 1947



The "Remuda" or horse show by all accounts featured a "western bathing beauty contest." But I can't locate a pic of the actual winner. However, these lovelies were in attendance, and certainly the giant hat qualifies this as one of our Weird Beauty Contests.



Posted By: Paul - Fri Nov 01, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Awards, Prizes, Competitions and Contests, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Regionalism, 1940s

Bossy the Electrified Cow

In the future, when robot cows rule the world, they'll look back on Bossy as one of the first of their kind.

Sumter County Journal - Apr 17, 1941

Posted By: Alex - Tue Oct 29, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Robots, Technology, AI, Robots and Other Automatons, Farming, Cows, 1940s

Follies of the Madmen #449



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Oct 23, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Fashion, Surrealism, 1940s

Office in an Elevator

This is a genius idea.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Oct 19, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Inventions, 1940s

The Swastika Chromosomes of D.F. Jones



D.F. Jones

Donald Forsha Jones (1890-1963) was an American genetics researcher at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven. Among biologists, he's remembered for improving corn production through his introduction of double-cross hybridization. In fact, the dominance of corn in world agriculture rests, in many ways, on his scientific contributions. However, he's not remembered for being a particularly colorful or eccentric character. Except for one moment in his career when a hint of weirdness surfaced. That was the time in April 1940 when he warned of the malignant influence of swastika-shaped chromosomes.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Fri Oct 11, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Science, 1940s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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