Category:
1950s

Back Rub

Posted By: Paul - Tue Sep 08, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Body, Hygiene, Baths, Showers and Other Cleansing Methods, Medicine, Music, 1950s

Follies of the Madmen #487



This impossible freakish dog is a true representative of the species, and thus can be a fine judge of the sponsor's food.

Plus, cats are jealous of both dog food and cigarettes.

Ad source.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Sep 06, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Food, Cats, Dogs, 1950s

Follies of the Madmen #486

Just a sample of the horrors you'll see after you drink enough of our booze.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Sep 04, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Animals, Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination, Horror, 1950s, Alcohol

Mystery Illustration 96

What's going on here?

The answer is at the link.

Or after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Tue Aug 18, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: 1950s

The science of removing bugs from windshields

When you clean bugs off your car's windshield, think of Detroit researcher Clark Wells who spent his career figuring out how best to do this.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Mar 22, 1953


WINDSHIELD-SPATTERING WITH A PURPOSE
The curious actions of Frederick Brownell (left) and Clark Wells at Detroit are in the interests of science. They are using pea-shooter and slingshot to shoot bugs against a windshield at squashing velocity so that Wells, a chemist, can then test fluids to be used in wiper spray to remove them. For his experiments, Wells buys such insects as bumble bees, June bugs, fish flies, deer flies and other of the more succulent species from collectors for amounts up to a dime each.


Huntsville Times - June 20, 1954


Inventor Clark Wells, of Fraser, Mich., lacked the bugs he needed to test out a windshield wiper fluid he was perfecting, so he placed a Classified Ad in a Detroit paper, soon had an adequate supply of bumblebees, June bugs and other insects.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Aug 08, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Insects, Science, 1950s, Cars

Follies of the Madmen #485



No infants were harmed in the making of this ad. Oh, wait a minute, they're not breathing...

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Aug 08, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Babies, Business, Advertising, Death, 1950s, Goofs and Screw-ups

Does your chewing gum lose its flavor on the bedpost overnight?

According to wikipedia, Lonnie Donegan was "Britain's most successful and influential recording artist before the Beatles." And yet, I'd never heard of him. Before my time, I guess. I wonder how many WU readers know of him?

In 1959, his song below hit #3 on the UK charts and #5 in the US (making it his biggest US hit).



It was a cover of this song from the 1920s:

Posted By: Alex - Fri Aug 07, 2020 - Comments (22)
Category: Music, 1950s

Roy Rogers Heads West

Here's another addition to our slowly growing collection of giant people in ads. Plus, this one has some bonus phallic symbolism!

Dayton Daily News - Dec 11, 1951

Posted By: Alex - Sun Aug 02, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Giant People in Ads, 1950s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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