Category:
1960s

Environments 3

Join the Be-In with the embedded player below. Then experience bucolic raptures.











Posted By: Paul - Mon Mar 04, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Hillbillies, Country Bumpkins, Ruralism and Flyover Country, Parades and Festivals, Vinyl Albums and Other Media Recordings, 1960s, 1970s

The Complacent Americans

One such gem is a Civil Defense "scare" album called THE COMPLACENT AMERICANS that simply must be heard to be believed. This LP - with its bright orange mushroom cloud cover and its hyperbolic advisories to sensitive listeners - could well have been produced by that genius of exploitation William Castle. But actually it was recorded under the stately auspices of the Office of Civil Defense, a sub-branch of the U.S. government (later replaced by FEMA).




Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 29, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: PSA’s, War, Vinyl Albums and Other Media Recordings, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1960s

Food from Petroleum

In recent years there's been lots of talk about finding new sources of food (insects, lab-grown meat, etc.) to feed the world. But back in the 1960s researcher Alfred Champagnat had already invented what he thought would be the food of the future: protein from petroleum.

Newsweek - Feb 27, 1967



Scientific American - Oct 1965



Champagnat's idea seems to have fallen by the wayside. There's a fairly recent article in Mold magazine that discusses his invention. It simply notes that the food industry had other priorities:

The urgency of providing sustainable protein alternatives was pressing and the petroleum process uses a lot less water than the equivalent weight in vegetable-based protein, not to mention the 2,000 gallons required to produce just 1 pound of beef. The project for single-cell proteins ran over many years until it was left aside because of other food industry priorities.

Wikipedia has some more info which suggests that the protein obtained from petroleum wasn't entirely safe to eat:

The "food from oil" idea became quite popular by the 1970s, with Champagnat being awarded the UNESCO Science Prize in 1976, and paraffin-fed yeast facilities being built in a number of countries. The primary use of the product was as poultry and cattle feed.
The Soviets were particularly enthusiastic, opening large "BVK" (belkovo-vitaminny kontsentrat, i.e., "protein-vitamin concentrate") plants next to their oil refineries in Kstovo (1973) and Kirishi (1974). The Soviet Ministry of Microbiological Industry had eight plants of this kind by 1989. However, due to concerns of toxicity of alkanes in SCP [single-cell proteins] and pressured by the environmentalist movements, the government decided to close them down, or convert to some other microbiological processes.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Feb 25, 2024 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, 1960s

Occupational Hazards of Being a Florist


Posted By: Paul - Sun Feb 25, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Death, Jobs and Occupations, Nature, 1960s

Stan Freberg’s Chun King Commercials

Well-known for his comedy and innovative commercials, Stan Freberg outdid himself for the Chun King campaign.









If you go to YouTube, you can see a classic hour of comedy that Freberg did with Chun King as the sponsor.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Feb 24, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Food, Humor, Television, Advertising, 1960s

The Orgy Game

Even the legendary site Board Game Geek has no additional info on this item.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 22, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Games, Advertising, 1960s, Sex

Follies of the Madmen #588

I wonder if they legally licensed Batman and the Flash from DC Comics?

Posted By: Paul - Tue Feb 20, 2024 - Comments (1)
Category: Advertising, Candy, Cartoons, Psychedelic, 1960s

Harold Tifft’s Portable Nuclear Bomb Shield

Harold Tifft claimed that his portable shield would "protect the wearer against heat, atomic radiation, atomic fall-out and flying debris in the event of nuclear warfare." When not in use it fit inside a carrying case, but when needed it could be rapidly assembled into a full-body shield. From his patent:

The compactness of the shield (due to the telescoping of the various sections) permits the owner thereof to easily carry it with him from place to place. Also, due to its compactness, it can be easily and unobtrusively stored in either the office or the home. When an alarm is sounded by civil defense authorities, civilians who have the described shield close at hand would be able to fit themselves with the shield in a very short period of time. A civilian thus outfitted could then place himself against the floor, the ground, or a vertical surface and wait until the explosion has occurred or the danger passed. The fact that each lower section telescopes with the section next above it enables the wearer to raise as many sections as may be necessary to permit walking or running in the event that the wearer is suddenly forced to abandon his position in favor of a safer one.

In his patent he never mentioned how much the thing weighed. Carrying the thing around constantly would surely have been a challenge.







Cincinnati Post - Jan 26, 1960

Posted By: Alex - Mon Feb 19, 2024 - Comments (3)
Category: Patents, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1960s

Fallout Fashion Show

It's no weirder than many of the outfits displayed at fashion shows nowadays.

Charlotte News - Oct 11, 1961

Posted By: Alex - Thu Feb 15, 2024 - Comments (0)
Category: Fashion, Atomic Power and Other Nuclear Matters, 1960s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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