Category:
Air Travel and Airlines

Douglas Bader, the Legless Ace



The Wikipedia page.

Bader joined the RAF in 1928, and was commissioned in 1930. In December 1931, while attempting some aerobatics, he crashed and lost both his legs. Having been on the brink of death, he recovered, retook flight training, passed his check flights and then requested reactivation as a pilot. Although there were no regulations applicable to his situation, he was retired against his will on medical grounds.[3]

After the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, however, Douglas Bader returned to the RAF and was accepted as a pilot. He scored his first victories over Dunkirk during the Battle of France in 1940. He then took part in the Battle of Britain and became a friend and supporter of Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory and his "Big Wing" experiments.

In August 1941, Bader baled out over German-occupied France and was captured. Soon afterward, he met and was befriended by Adolf Galland, a prominent German fighter ace.[4] Despite his disability, Bader made a number of escape attempts and was eventually sent to the prisoner of war camp at Colditz Castle. He remained there until April 1945 when the camp was liberated by the First United States Army.


He even featured in a comic. (Use link for readable copy of image below.)





Posted By: Paul - Mon Sep 16, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Accidents, War, Air Travel and Airlines, 1940s, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Warhol Flies Braniff

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jul 21, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Business, Advertising, Air Travel and Airlines, 1960s

The Whirlybirds

Once upon a time, helicopters were miraculous and sexy enough to fuel a TV show. What technology could do so today? THE SEGWAY SQUAD? ADVENTURES OF THE JUMP BIKE PATROL? CAPTAIN BIRD SCOOTER?

The Wikipedia page.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jun 23, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Technology, Television, Air Travel and Airlines, 1950s

Shortest Commercial Flight

Odd Trivia: The shortest scheduled commercial flight in the world takes a mere 90 seconds. It's the Loganair flight between the Scottish islands of Westray and Papa Westray. From cntraveler.com:

In good conditions, Loganair’s 1.7-mile jaunt between the Scottish islands of Westray (population: 640) and Papa Westray (population: 72) in the Orkneys, off the north coast of the mainland, can take under a minute. Headwinds can make the flight a whopping two-and-a-half minutes. Retired police officer Graham Maben is one of the route’s regulars; the 70-year-old Orkney native now runs a tour business on the islands, and estimates he has taken the flight around 40 times over the past 15 years.

Posted By: Alex - Sat May 11, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: World Records, Air Travel and Airlines

Common courtesy to light a match

“An American Airlines flight was forced to make an emergency landing Monday morning after a passenger lit a match to disguise the scent of flatulence, authorities said.”


Springfield News-Leader - Dec 6, 2006

Posted By: Alex - Sun Mar 17, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Flatulence, Air Travel and Airlines, 2000s

Golf Ball Hits Airplane

Back in in 1969, a golfer accidentally managed to hit a plane with his ball. The ball went through the plexiglass windshield and into the cockpit.

Which raises the question: Do golf balls pose a potential hazard to planes? This is discussed in a thread over at aviation.stackexchange.com, and the consensus seems to be, not really. Even if a golf ball were, somehow, to get into a plane's engine, it's probably small enough that it wouldn't cause damage.

Oakland Tribune - Jan 16, 1969



I was curious about how often golfers hit planes. Apparently, not often. But some googling yielded this video, which purports to show a golfer hitting a 757 with a ball. Though no one in the YouTube comments seems to believe he actually hit the plane.

Posted By: Alex - Wed Mar 06, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Sports, Air Travel and Airlines

Follies of the Madmen #403



"We really move our tail for you." Not acceptable today as a slogan?

However, the "Coach Pub" is always in style.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Dec 31, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Innuendo, Double Entendres, Symbolism, Nudge-Nudge-Wink-Wink and Subliminal Messages, Advertising, Air Travel and Airlines, 1970s

Emma Harbin, the Dixie Eagle

Not only was she one of the earliest women aviators, but she also helped her husband run a tourist court and dairy! (Lots of great fotos at the link.)



Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 28, 2018 - Comments (0)
Category: Daredevils, Stuntpeople and Thrillseekers, Regionalism, Air Travel and Airlines, Hotels, Twentieth Century

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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