Category:
Alcohol

The Breath of a Nation

This is so clever and visually surreal that's it's hard to believe it was not made yesterday.



Lots more info here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri May 10, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Surrealism, Cartoons, Marriage, 1910s, Alcohol

Lodi Grape Festival Queen

Here is the first holder of the honor.



Read article here.

The festival continues to this day, but I find no reference to a queen.



Posted By: Paul - Fri Apr 12, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Contests, Races and Other Competitions, Food, Regionalism, 1930s, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #421



Perfect today for our climate-change world!

Posted By: Paul - Sun Apr 07, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Armageddon and Apocalypses, Business, Advertising, Nature, 1960s, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #418



Nothing said about the quality of the men (or women) attracted by Colt 45.

Source of ad.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Mar 16, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, 1960s, Alcohol

Hostetter’s Bitters





Hostetter's "Celebrated" Bitters was a nostrum developed by Dr. Jacob Hostetter of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. His son, David Hostetter, put the formula into large scale production in 1853 and it soon became a national best-seller. During the Civil War, Dr. J. Hostetter's Stomach Bitters was sold to soldiers as "a positive protective against the fatal maladies of the Southern swamps, and the poisonous tendency of the impure rivers and bayous." The original formula was about 47% alcohol -- 94 Proof! The amount of alcohol was so high that it was served in Alaskan saloons by the glass. Hostetter sweetened the alcohol with sugar to which he added a few aromatic oils (anise, coriander, etc.) and vegetable bitters (cinchona, gentian, etc.) to give it a medicinal flavor. From 1954 to 1958, when it was no longer marketed, the product was known as Hostetter Tonic.


More info here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Feb 21, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Antiques, Anachronisms and Throwbacks, Advertising, Patent Medicines, Nostrums and Snake Oil, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, Alcohol

Hangovers Due to Guilty Conscience

In 1973, Professor Robert Gunn advanced this theory.



Twenty years later, he was still pursuing the idea, as you can see in the scientific paper at the link.

To reappraise a prior study of hangover signs and psychosocial factors among a sample of current drinkers, we excluded a subgroup termed Sobers, who report "never" being "tipsy, high or drunk." The non-sober current drinkers then formed the sample for this report (N = 1104). About 23% of this group reported no hangover signs regardless of their intake level or gender, and the rest showed no sex differences for any of 8 hangover signs reported. Using multiple regression, including ethanol, age and weight, it was found that psychosocial variables contributed independently in predicting to hangover for both men and women in this order: (1) guilt about drinking; (2) neuroticism; (3) angry or (4) depressed when high/drunk and (5) negative life events. For men only, ethanol intake was also significant; for women only, being younger and reporting first being high/drunk at a relatively earlier age were also predictors of the Hangover Sign Index (HSI). These multiple predictors accounted for 5-10 times more of the hangover variance than alcohol use alone: for men, R = 0.43, R2 = 19%; and for women, R = 0.46, R2 = 21%. The findings suggest that hangover signs are a function of age, sex, ethanol level and psychosocial factors.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Feb 10, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Science, Experiments, Psychology, 1970s, 1990s, Pain, Self-inflicted and Otherwise, Alcohol

Follies of the Madmen #405



Ancient Romans drank vodka? Oh well, I suppose the ad is as authentic as the movie it references--which is actually one of my favorite comedies.

Ad source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jan 07, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, History, Unexplained Historical Enigmas, Alcohol

Beaver-Flavored Booze



Eau de Musc proudly features an old-world flavoring technique that uses the oil extract from the castor gland of the North American beaver, which exudes a leathery, raspberry taste, and acts to fortify the whiskey flavors.


Get yours here!

Posted By: Paul - Sun Dec 30, 2018 - Comments (5)
Category: Animals, Alcohol, Nausea, Revulsion and Disgust

Follies of the Madmen #401



Not quite sure why a kangaroo would be deemed an apt symbol for a conservation-minded USA citizen. Weren't there any miserly Scotsmen available?

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Dec 17, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Animals, Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Money, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1940s, Alcohol

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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