Category:
Cartoons

Tony Sarg

Tony Sarg, "America's Puppet Master," did some weird stuff, among which were early Macy's Thanksgiving Parade balloons; the cartoon below; and his inflatable beach monster on Nantucket.













Posted By: Paul - Thu Oct 12, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Puppets and Automatons, Cartoons, 1920s, 1930s

Easy Does It:  Canned Goods Rule



The bad-acid-trip Good Fairy of Canned Vegetables talks about marketplace disruptions and paradigm shifts, and serves as Cupid. Be sure to enjoy the suicidal tomatoes plunging to their canned goods deaths.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 23, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Retailing, Food, Cartoons, 1940s

“Yogi” by The Ivy Three

Posted By: Paul - Tue Sep 05, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Humor, Music, Cartoons, 1960s

The Films of Suzan Pitt









Wikipedia page.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Jul 30, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Art, Avant Garde, Cartoons, 1970s

Oedipus

Oedipus, National Film Board of Canada

Posted By: Paul - Mon May 01, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Surrealism, Cartoons, Twenty-first Century, Head

Fred and Barney Meet the Thing





A mashup no one ever asked for.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Mar 07, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Television, Comics, Cartoons, 1970s

The Voice of Snow White

Snow White and Adriana Caselotti (source: The Disney Wiki)


I came across a story in a 1938 newspaper about how Adriana Caselotti got the job of being the voice of Snow White in Disney's 1937 movie:

Three years ago when Adriana Caselotti, above, was 18, she was a naughty little girl who listened in on the phone calls of her father, Guido Caselotti, Hollywood voice teacher. When the Walt Disney studio called one day asking him to find the right voice for Snow White, she piped "Me, me, me, how about me?" into the extension on which she had been eavesdropping. The studio liked her cheerful chirping, and she became the "voice" of the fairy story heroine. Now she hopes to become a movie actress.

Unfortunately for Caselotti, her dream of becoming a movie actress didn't turn out as she hoped. In fact, providing the voice for Snow White turned out to be the worst career move she could have possibly made as an aspiring actress — because Walt Disney, wanting to preserve the "illusion of Snow White," decided he couldn't have her voice be heard in any other context. So he prevented Caselotti from ever finding work as an actress again, except for minor appearances in The Wizard of Oz and It's a Wonderful Life.

As a consolation prize for having destroyed her career, the Disney company named her a "Disney Legend" in 1994.

From wikipedia:

In 1935, after a brief stint as a chorus girl at MGM, Walt Disney hired Caselotti as the voice of his heroine Snow White. She was paid a total of $970 for working on the film (worth approximately $16,160 as of 2011). She was under contract with Disney, and Disney prevented her from appearing in further film and other media, even for Disney, after Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Jack Benny specifically mentioned that he had asked Disney for permission to use her on his radio show and was told, "I'm sorry, but that voice can't be used anywhere. I don't want to spoil the illusion of Snow White." The only other work Caselotti did following her premiere was an uncredited role in MGM's The Wizard of Oz (1939); she provided the voice of Juliet during the Tin Man's song, "If I Only Had a Heart", speaking the line, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" In 1946, she had an uncredited role in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life, singing in Martini's bar as James Stewart was praying.

Wilkes Barre Times Leader - Apr 8, 1938

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jan 08, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Movies, Cartoons, Actors

Yogi’s Space Race





Here in the fortieth anniversary year of Star Wars, let us pause to consider all the ways in which it elevated the genre of science fiction, inspiring such followers as Yogi's Space Race.

Wikipedia page here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Jan 05, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Aliens, Anthropomorphism, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Homages, Pastiches, Tributes and Borrowings, Cartoons, 1970s

Just Imagine



The uproarious laughter by the human executive at the antics of Tommy Telephone, a plainly impossible vision, proclaims that the fellow is gratefully descending into the dark swamp of insanity due to the high stresses of his job.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 10, 2016 - Comments (2)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Products, Communications, Delusions, Fantasies and Other Tricks of the Imagination, Technology, Telephones, Cartoons, Stop-motion Animation, 1940s, Brain Damage

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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