Category:
Christmas

How to eat your Christmas tree

Artisan baker Julia Georgallis recently came out with a book that promises to tell you How To Eat Your Christmas Tree.

Amazon Link


That sounds like an interesting challenge. Unfortunately, as far as I can tell, the book doesn't tell you how to eat the entire tree. Instead, it's mostly about using the needles and bark in recipes.

But some searching on YouTube produced a video that delves into how to eat the entire tree. The catch is that to do so you'll need to pulp the wood and transform it into cellulose powder. Which is probably beyond the means of most people. But the video notes that cellulose powder derived from spruce trees is in many products, including parmesan cheese, pasta sauce, and ice cream. So almost everyone has eaten (highly processed) Christmas trees already.

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jan 15, 2021 - Comments (2)
Category: Food, Cookbooks, Christmas

Santa Claus sues Santa Claus

The dispute began in 1935 between two toy and candy companies, both based in the town of Santa Claus, Indiana. On one side there was Santa Claus, Inc. On the other side was Santa Claus of Santa Claus, Inc. The former alleged that the latter shouldn't have chosen such a similar name.

In response, Santa Claus of Santa Claus, Inc. charged that its rival illegally put up a 25-foot, 20-ton Santa statue on land leased to Santa Claus of Santa Claus, Inc.

The lawsuit, Santa Claus, Inc. v. Santa Claus of Santa Claus, Inc., eventually made its way up to the Indiana Supreme Court.

As far as I can tell, Santa Claus of Santa Claus, Inc. won the fight. But either way you look at it, Santa Claus won.

Muncie Evening Press - Dec 30, 1935

Posted By: Alex - Fri Dec 25, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Lawsuits, 1930s, Christmas

Nativity with Santa and Rudolph

In 2009, Marion Davis of Randallstown, Maryland got a design patent for this "Nativity scene decoration including Santa Claus and Rudolph".

But why stop with Santa and Rudolph? She could have added Frosty the Snowman and the Coca-Cola polar bears for even more holiday cheer.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Dec 24, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Christmas

Cannibal Sandwiches

In what has apparently become an annual ritual, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services has warned Wisconsinites that 'cannibal sandwiches' (aka raw beef or tartare sandwiches) pose a health risk, and that it's really better to cook the meat first.

Somehow I've gone my entire life without knowing that there was such a thing as cannibal sandwiches — let alone that they're considered a Christmas tradition in Wisconsin.

The traditional recipe for a cannibal sandwich is raw ground beef spread open-faced on rye bread. Salt and pepper the meat. Then add a few raw onions. Some people like a dash of Worcestershire on the meat. The sandwich should be served very cold. And it's common to have it with a beer.

Posted By: Alex - Tue Dec 15, 2020 - Comments (9)
Category: Food, Christmas

Follies of the Madmen #482



A kind of housewife voodoo.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 10, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Business, Advertising, Appliances, 1950s, Christmas

Don’t Do It Santa!

Arrow Shirts — saving Santa from suicide!

Life magazine - Dec 15, 1947

Posted By: Alex - Wed Dec 25, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Advertising, 1940s, Christmas

What does Mrs. Claus do when she gets lonely?

Don't the elves keep her company?

Esquire - Jan 1971

Posted By: Alex - Wed Dec 26, 2018 - Comments (0)
Category: Advertising, 1970s, Christmas

Christmas Hats

Tampa Times - Jan 4, 1939



Wisconsin State Journal - Dec 30, 1957



The Munster Times - Dec 20, 1965

Posted By: Alex - Tue Dec 25, 2018 - Comments (2)
Category: Headgear, Christmas

Santa dies again

What would Christmas be without Santa dying?

Back in 2016, I posted a list of various Santas that have died over the years, often collapsing in front of crowds of horrified children. The Moscow Times reports that it's happened again:

A Russian Santa Claus has reportedly died during New Year’s festivities at a kindergarten in Siberia.
Known as Ded Moroz, or Father Frost, Russian versions of Santa Claus host children’s holiday parties with the fairy tale snow maiden Snegurochka, in a still-popular Soviet-era tradition.
A man in a Ded Moroz costume died during festivities at a kindergarten in the Siberian city of Kemerovo, the local sibdepo.ru news website reported Tuesday.
“The man felt ill in the kindergarten, he was taken in an ambulance but died on the way to the hospital,” the outlet cited an unnamed medical source as saying.
The unidentified 67-year-old Ded Moroz “complained of chest pain” and died before the ambulance arrived, Interfax cited another unnamed source as saying.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Dec 23, 2018 - Comments (1)
Category: Christmas

Nobody Shoots at Santa Claus

Not entirely true.

Newsweek - Feb 15, 1965



Arizona Daily Star - Dec 25, 2013

Posted By: Alex - Mon Dec 25, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Christmas

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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