Category:
Crime

Stolen Lampposts

Police in Lelystad (the Netherlands) arrested a man who was driving with two stolen lampposts strapped to the top of his car. They posted the following picture to their Facebook page.



Google Translate provides the following translation of the picture's caption (and I think Google translate has been getting better lately, because this translation is fairly comprehensible):

This morning around 10:00 the police reported a passenger car riding from Almere to Lelystad with two huge lampposts on the roof. At the Oostvaardersdijk in Lelystad the combination was held and the driver checked.

We start with the traffic violations. That the cargo can not be transported in this way may be clear. In addition, the car was not insured and the APK had been running for more than three months. The driver's license B was declared invalid by the end of 2016. The colleagues smoke with the driver an alcoholic air. However, he refused to cooperate with a blow test on which he was arrested. Expectation is that the court will demand the highest possible penalty for driving under the influence of alcohol because the suspect did not cooperate with the investigation.

The investigation investigated the origin of the lampposts. These are most likely stolen in Almere. In addition, there appeared to be other criminal investigations to the suspect, such as refueling without paying.

The suspect is embedded in the cell complex and has now been insured. The car has been seized.

In summary, seems that the guy was drunk, uninsured, had an expired driver's license, and was driving around with two stolen lampposts on top of his car.

My question is, what was he planning to do with the lampposts?

Posted By: Alex - Sat Aug 05, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Crime, Stupid Criminals, Cars

The Takeaway Rembrandt

In 1632 Rembrandt painted a portrait of Jacob de Gheyn III, an engraver living in Utrecht. The portrait is quite small, measuring approximately 12 by 10 inches. As a result, it's relatively easy to steal and has earned the nickname "The Takeaway Rembrandt" because of the number of times it's been swiped.

From wikipedia:
The painting has been given the moniker "takeaway Rembrandt" as it has been stolen four times since 1966 – the most recorded of any painting.

Between 14 August 1981 and 3 September 1981 the painting was taken from Dulwich Picture Gallery and retrieved when police arrested four men in a taxi who had the painting with them. A little under two years later a burglar smashed a skylight and descended through it into the art gallery, using a crowbar to remove the painting from the wall. The police arrived within three minutes but were too late to apprehend the thief. The painting was missing for three years, eventually being found on 8 October 1986 in a luggage rack at the train station of a British army garrison in Münster, Germany.

The other two times, the painting was found once underneath a bench in a graveyard in Streatham, and once on the back of a bicycle. Each time the painting has been returned anonymously with more than one person being charged for its disappearance.




St. Cloud Times - Feb 17, 1973

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jun 22, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Art, Crime, 1970s

Art Pays Off!





Original story here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jun 19, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Art, Crime, 1930s

Underworld Lingo



Source: page 51 of this magazine.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jun 12, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Crime, Languages, 1930s

Helpful Dead Wife






Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jun 02, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Crime, Death, Superstition, Marriage, 1900s

Jack the Stripper



Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Mon May 22, 2017 - Comments (7)
Category: Crime, Public Indecency, 1960s, Women, Nudism

Unauthorized Dwellings 1

The theme of people living secretly where they should not be living is a perennial one. Here is an instance from the Sixties.




Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue May 16, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Crime, Unauthorized Dwellings, 1960s

Groucho & Chico Go To Jail





I cannot find any subsequent info on this case, which I had never heard of before. Did the Marx Bros. win on appeal? I certainly don't think they ever went to jail.

Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri May 05, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Crime, Humor, Comedians, 1930s

Billie Carleton’s Death and the Birth of a Genre



Original article here.

How did the hedonistic death of one minor actress lead to Fu Manchu and the Yellow Menace?


Read the whole story here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Apr 21, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Addictions, Crime, Death, Literature, Stereotypes and Cliches, 1910s

Musical Prisoner



In 1949, LIFE told us about Frank Grandstaff, who composed a cantata while jailed, and earned a brief release to hear it performed. But what happened afterwards?

Original story here.



Original article here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Apr 19, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Crime, Music, 1940s, 1950s

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

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