Category:
Cryptozoology

The New Jersey Vegetable Monster

As defined by Leonard George in his encyclopedic work Alternative Realities: The Paranormal, the Mystic and the Transcendent in Human Experience

New Jersey Vegetable Monster — A humanoid resembling a giant stalk of broccoli, reputedly seen one night by a drunk in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. The case has entered the folklore of animalistic studies as representing the least evidential type of unusual experience report.

Loren Coleman and Bruce Hallenbeck offer some more context in their book Monsters of New Jersey:

If Leonard George is to be remembered for anything, it should be for a term that hits the name on the head and speaks to the topic and state that is the focus of this volume. George has coined the phrase New Jersey Vegetable Monster, which is today used by cryptozoologists and other researchers of anomalous phenomena and the unexplained to describe a sighting or incident that has exceptionally poor evidential support. He discusses the case of page 194 of his book, Alternative Realities.

According to George, the term originated with a sighting reported by a single severely intoxicated eyewitness, who claimed to have observed a humanoid resembling a giant stalk of broccoli. The original sighting, which allegedly occurred in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, was likely attributable to a case of delirium tremens.

The basis of the use of this expression today is that if something is so absurd and the eyewitness lacks almost any credibility, a cryptozoologist investigating this nearly completely unreliable sighting, out of no disrespect to other credible witnesses, may quietly slip the rejected case in his New Jersey Vegetable Monster file.

Unfortunately, I haven't been able to track down the original report that inspired the New Jersey Vegetable Monster. I'm not sure it was ever reported in papers.

Posted By: Alex - Tue Feb 04, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Cryptozoology, Fictional Monsters

Ponyhenge



Article here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 27, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Art, Cryptozoology, Eccentrics

The Bigfoot Cookbook

Created by Jean and Boyd Brougher of Salem, Oregon in 1978. The cookbook came with a giant-footprint baking pan.

Some of the recipes are below. They seem pretty generic. The only thing that makes them Bigfoot recipes is that they're supposed to be cooked in the footprint pan.

Amazon has a listing for the Bigfoot Cookbook, but notes that it's currently unavailable. And even if it were available, it no longer includes the pan (which, I'm sure, is probably considered a prize collectible among Bigfoot enthusiasts).

Jean and Boyd Brougher show off their cookbook.



Statesman Journal - Feb 28, 1979



Posted By: Alex - Fri May 31, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Cryptozoology, Food, 1970s

Follies of the Madmen #346



I was unaware that mermaids were lured by cigar smoke.


Full ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jan 12, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Cryptozoology, Tobacco and Smoking, 1940s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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