Category:
Cult Figures and Artifacts

Crater Critters and Kin



Between 1959 and 1977, an Australian company based in Melbourne called Rosenhain and Lipmann (commonly known as R&L) designed and manufactured unique and innovative toys that became hugely popular both in Australia and overseas.[1] R&L started out making snap-together items that worked like tiny plastic model kits that didn't need any glue and were issued in a clear glassine bag, inside Kellogg's cereal boxes. Between 1959 and 1977, over 70 different sets were released and it is estimated that about one billion R&L toys were delivered around the world.


Quote from Wikipedia entry.

Explore all the sets at this great site.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 31, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Cult Figures and Artifacts, Food, Freebies, Come-ons and Loss Leaders, Twentieth Century

Plaid Stallions

Endless hours of browsing at this blog dedicated to 70s culture.





Posted By: Paul - Sun Jun 30, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Cult Figures and Artifacts, Culture and Civilization, Customs, Pop Art, 1970s

Spikehorn Meyer, Friend to Bears

One of the forerunners of those folks who cuddle up to bears. Luckily, Spikehorn was never hurt.



Article here.

Find-a-grave site.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jun 21, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Animals, Cult Figures and Artifacts, Daredevils, Stuntpeople and Thrillseekers, Eccentrics, Regionalism, Twentieth Century

The Mystery of Ambrose Small

Master Weirdist Charles Fort once made a jest involving two mysterious vanishings: "Was somebody collecting Ambroses?"

One of the Ambroses involved was the famous Ambrose Bierce.

The other was much less-known: Ambrose Small.

One would think that after so many years, all had been said about Small's disappearance. But I can't find any reference to this further extension of the case as seen below.






Original article here.

More on the Small case.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Oct 22, 2018 - Comments (3)
Category: Crime, Cult Figures and Artifacts, Death, Twentieth Century

Alois Swoboda



His Wikipedia page tells us:

His course did not use apparatus or exercise equipment. Claims in Swoboda's courses included the ability to regrow lost limbs and heal a heart damaged by a heart attack.


Article in POPULAR MECHANICS to be found here.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jul 03, 2018 - Comments (7)
Category: Body, Bodybuilding, Diseases, Cult Figures and Artifacts, Exercise and Fitness, Frauds, Cons and Scams, Twentieth Century

A Thief in the Night

Before there was the LEFT BEHIND series, there was this.

Wikipedia entry here.





Posted By: Paul - Tue Jun 19, 2018 - Comments (0)
Category: Armageddon and Apocalypses, Cult Figures and Artifacts, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Movies, Religion, 1970s

The Can Museum

It seems to me that you could profitably waste many hours exploring The Can Museum.



Posted By: Paul - Tue Dec 05, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Cult Figures and Artifacts, Culture and Civilization, Products, Retailing, Collectors

The Fountain of the World Cult



"Members of Fountain of the World cult in Chatsworth are pallbearers and mourners at funeral of their leader Krishna Venta and two other cult members killed in dynamiting of their headquarters."

Read a long fascinating article on this Manson precursor at the LA WEEKLY.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Nov 16, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Cult Figures and Artifacts, Death, 1940s, 1950s

Page 1 of 3 pages  1 2 3 > 




weird universe thumbnail
Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Contact Us
Monthly Archives
November 2019 •  October 2019 •  September 2019 •  August 2019 •  July 2019 •  June 2019 •  May 2019 •  April 2019 •  March 2019 •  February 2019 •  January 2019

December 2018 •  November 2018 •  October 2018 •  September 2018 •  August 2018 •  July 2018 •  June 2018 •  May 2018 •  April 2018 •  March 2018 •  February 2018 •  January 2018

December 2017 •  November 2017 •  October 2017 •  September 2017 •  August 2017 •  July 2017 •  June 2017 •  May 2017 •  April 2017 •  March 2017 •  February 2017 •  January 2017

December 2016 •  November 2016 •  October 2016 •  September 2016 •  August 2016 •  July 2016 •  June 2016 •  May 2016 •  April 2016 •  March 2016 •  February 2016 •  January 2016

December 2015 •  November 2015 •  October 2015 •  September 2015 •  August 2015 •  July 2015 •  June 2015 •  May 2015 •  April 2015 •  March 2015 •  February 2015 •  January 2015

December 2014 •  November 2014 •  October 2014 •  September 2014 •  August 2014 •  July 2014 •  June 2014 •  May 2014 •  April 2014 •  March 2014 •  February 2014 •  January 2014

December 2013 •  November 2013 •  October 2013 •  September 2013 •  August 2013 •  July 2013 •  June 2013 •  May 2013 •  April 2013 •  March 2013 •  February 2013 •  January 2013

December 2012 •  November 2012 •  October 2012 •  September 2012 •  August 2012 •  July 2012 •  June 2012 •  May 2012 •  April 2012 •  March 2012 •  February 2012 •  January 2012

December 2011 •  November 2011 •  October 2011 •  September 2011 •  August 2011 •  July 2011 •  June 2011 •  May 2011 •  April 2011 •  March 2011 •  February 2011 •  January 2011

December 2010 •  November 2010 •  October 2010 •  September 2010 •  August 2010 •  July 2010 •  June 2010 •  May 2010 •  April 2010 •  March 2010 •  February 2010 •  January 2010

December 2009 •  November 2009 •  October 2009 •  September 2009 •  August 2009 •  July 2009 •  June 2009 •  May 2009 •  April 2009 •  March 2009 •  February 2009 •  January 2009

December 2008 •  November 2008 •  October 2008 •  September 2008 •  August 2008 •  July 2008 •