Category:
Death

Crestone End-of-Life Project

The only place in the United States where it's legal to have an open-air cremation is the town of Crestone, Colorado. And specifically at the "outdoor human cremation facility" maintained by the Crestone End-of-Life Project.

However, if you're not from there, they won't cremate you. As explained by US Funerals Online:

Currently, the service is only offered to the local community.  This decision was made out of respect for local residents who did not want their community to over-run with outsiders wanting 'novel' cremations.  The project is also only geared to handle a limited number of ceremonies per year.



Posted By: Alex - Fri Jan 13, 2023 - Comments (1)
Category: Death

Follies of the Madmen #552

Please note the last cartoon in this ad (magnified below). Man attempts to kill mother-in-law by darkening the stairwell. Everything A-OK!

Source.



Posted By: Paul - Mon Jan 09, 2023 - Comments (2)
Category: Death, Domestic, Technology, Advertising, 1950s

The Anomaly That Wouldn’t Go Away

In medical literature, the "anomaly that wouldn't go away" refers to a finding published in 1978 by a group of Welsh doctors (Cochrane, St Leger, and Moore). They had set out to examine the relationship between health services and mortality in the major developed countries, but in doing so they came across a correlation that surprised them — the more doctors there were per capita, the higher was the rate of infant mortality.

The correlation wasn't a weak one. In fact, for infant mortality it was the strongest correlation in their study. The number of doctors per capita seemed to have a stronger negative impact on infant mortality than did the level of cigarette or alcohol consumption in the population.



Obviously the researchers found the correlation unsettling since, ideally, more doctors should result in fewer, not more, infants dying.

So why would more doctors correlate with higher infant mortality? The three doctors did their best to figure this out:



As the above passage indicates, they didn't think it was plausible that doctors themselves were somehow responsible for the elevated infant mortality, but nor could they come up with a satisfactory explanation for the correlation. So they called it "the anomaly that wouldn't go away."

I'm not sure if the correlation still holds true. I believe it still did about twenty years ago. Unfortunately much of the relevant literature is locked behind paywalls.

Over the years there have been quite a few attempts to explain the anomaly. I've listed two below. Again, I'm not sure if one has been accepted as THE explanation. So the anomaly may still persist.

C Buck & V Bacsi, "The doctor anomaly," Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 1979, 33:307.

It occurred to us that some of the countries richly endowed with physicians may obtain their large supplies by having bigger medical schools, larger classes, and thus less individual instruction of the medical student. The consequence could be a poorer standard of medical practice, the influence of which would be evident in the mortality of the younger age groups where the outcome of disease is most susceptible to the physician's skill.

F.W. Young, "An explanation of the persistent doctor-mortality association," Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2001, 55:80-84.

The explanation proposed here is that, as compared with other regions, the expectation of opportunities in the growing industrial cities initially attracts an over supply of doctors. Once in practice, doctors in new regions enjoy fewer economies of scale, which means that they are more numerous as compared with the mature regions. These same industrialising cities attract rural immigrants whose health habits and supports break down in the context of city life. Thus, the places with the most doctors also have the highest death rates, but the two variables are associated only by common location.

More info (pdf): Cochrane, Leger, & Moore, "Health service 'input' and mortality 'output' in developed countries."

Posted By: Alex - Fri Dec 23, 2022 - Comments (9)
Category: Babies, Death, Medicine

1920s Motorized Skis

We previously featured caterpillar-tread skis, but here's an earlier, alternate technology.

Full patent here.





Posted By: Paul - Fri Dec 16, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Death, Sports, 1920s

Meshes of the Afternoon



The Wikipedia page.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Dec 09, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Death, Movies, Surrealism, 1940s

The Christmas Custom of Dead Bird Postcards

Back in the 19th century, people often sent each other postcards of dead birds during the Christmas season. Collectors Weekly explains:

"The Victorians had some really strange ideas about what served as an appropriate Christmas greeting," says Bo Wreden, who recently organized an exhibition of holiday cards for the Book Club of California. "They liked to send out cards with dead birds on them, robins in particular, which related to ancient customs and legends. There's a famous quotation from the Venerable Bede about a sparrow flying through the hall of a castle while the nobility is celebrating Christmas: The moment from when it enters until it flies out is very brief, a metaphor for how quickly our lives pass." Apparently, killing a wren or robin was once a good-luck ritual performed in late December, and during the late 19th century, cards featuring the bodies of these birds were sent to offer good luck in the New Year.






More info: hyperallergic.com

Posted By: Alex - Mon Dec 05, 2022 - Comments (4)
Category: Customs, Death, Christmas

Recipes on Tombstones

I've never come across this in a graveyard, but apparently some people have their favorite recipe inscribed on their tombstone. This inspires other people, such as Rosie Grant, to cook the recipes they find on tombstones. More info: The Guardian, TikTok



Posted By: Alex - Sat Dec 03, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Death, Food

Unlikely Reasons for Murder No. 12

Source: Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) 17 Feb 1949, Thu Page 21

Posted By: Paul - Sat Dec 03, 2022 - Comments (1)
Category: Crime, Death, Feet, Alcohol

Unlikely Reasons for Murder No. 11

In 1952, a schizophrenic with an eccentric theory of physics murdered a random person.

“Have they dropped the electronic theory?” he asked her.

“I don’t know anything about it,” she replied.

Before she could say more, he fired the gun at her.

“I just wanted to kill somebody,” he told police. “I was going to shoot anybody. It was my book. They wouldn't look at my book. They wouldn't even look at it."

Peakes had done the calculus: Shooting people gets you in the papers. And if you shoot physicists because they rejected your theory, your theory gets in the papers.


Full account here.

The initial coverage below.

Article source: The South Bend Tribune (South Bend, Indiana) 15 Jul 1952, Tue Page 1



Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 02, 2022 - Comments ()
Category: Death, Science, Scary Criminals, 1950s, Mental Health and Insanity

Death by Halloween costume

Redlands Daily Facts - Nov 2, 1981

Posted By: Alex - Mon Oct 31, 2022 - Comments (2)
Category: Death, 1980s, Halloween

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Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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