Category:
Death

Lightning-Struck Brassieres

Fatalities that occurred in 1982 and 1999 reveal that wearing an underwire bra in a lightning storm can lead to loss of life.

St. Joseph News-Press Gazette - Jun 19, 1982



The Vancouver Sun - Oct 28, 1999

Posted By: Alex - Wed Jul 01, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Death, Underwear

Reusing Old Graves

Prompted by a concern that British cemeteries were running out of space, Professor Douglas Davies was commissioned to research public attitudes about reusing graves. The result was his book Reusing Old Graves, which became the 1995 winner of the Diagram Prize for oddest title of the year.

More info from a review in the Ecclesiastical Law Journal:

The primary inquiry of the research was put in a leading way. Respondents were not asked 'Do you think graves should or should not be reused?'. Instead they were asked what period of time should elapse before a grave could be used for new burials by a different family. Despite the form of the question 35 per cent of respondents said they never should be reused. As against this 62 per cent were willing to countenance the reuse of graves after varying periods (3 per cent were undecided). The periods given ranged from one year to two hundred, the most popular being 100, 50, 20, 30, 75, 150, and 10 in that order.

Posted By: Alex - Mon Jun 15, 2020 - Comments (5)
Category: Death, Books

Unlikely Reasons for Murder No. 2

Our beloved Chuck Shepherd used to feature a theme which was, as I recall, along the lines of "unlikely reasons for murdering someone." It's probably time to revive the topic.

Here, a wife kills her husband--and others--so that no one will take her husband away.



Source (scroll leftwards).

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jun 03, 2020 - Comments (5)
Category: Death, Family, 1950s

Freeze-Dried Human Bodies

Philip Backman's 1978 patent describes a process for freeze-drying human bodies.

The problem with freeze-drying any large animal is that there's not enough surface area to allow for rapid freeze-drying. So, to increase the surface area, Backman explained that it would first be necessary to freeze the body and then smash it into small pieces in a hammer mill. Once the body had undergone this "surface enhancement," it could be rapidly freeze-dried, which would remove the water in the body, reducing its weight by 95%. The resulting remains could be kept in an urn, just like cremated remains.

Backman argued that his freeze-drying process had all the advantages of cremation (in terms of reducing the body to a compact size), but cost less. However, the funeral industry apparently didn't like the idea of running bodies through a hammer mill.



Posted By: Alex - Sun May 31, 2020 - Comments (6)
Category: Death, Inventions, 1970s

Buried at the golf course

In 1989, a Canadian company tried to promote the idea of burying people at golf courses. They imagined that courses could add memorial walls made out of their patented "mod-urns" — hollow, cremain-filled building blocks that could be snapped together to make instant memorial walls.

A company rep argued that this could be "a potentially lucrative business for golf courses, who could pack in up to 50,000 new 'members' per acre."



Ottawa Citizen - Sep 29, 1989

Posted By: Alex - Mon May 25, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Death, Sports, 1980s

Coffin Cradle


From the Strand Magazine - Vol 8, 1894:

Here we have an article which brings both extremes of existence together—the symbol of death is used to rest the babe who has just begun life—birth and death are mentally associated upon contemplating this peculiar outcome of man's mind. Whether intended to impress the growing child with the nearness of death, and to demand a due reverence for the future state of man, or whether merely the result of a morbid desire to connect the mind continually with the undertaker, I cannot venture to say; although it must be admitted that the cross fixed at the head of this curious cradle substantiates the supposition that a religious idea prompted its construction. The bells, which tinkle upon occasions when the cradle is being rocked, seem to point to the wish on the parents' part to comfort the little darling of humanity destined to occupy this coffin-cradle.

Posted By: Alex - Tue May 12, 2020 - Comments (2)
Category: Babies, Death, Furniture

Richard Sala, RIP

I loved the comics made by Richard Sala, a truly unique talent. As one of my Facebook pals, he was always funny, kind and clever. Alas, he's gone now.

Here a rare bit of animation from him--INVISIBLE HANDS, the first bit--one of his first big breaks leading to a wonderful career, cut short.



Posted By: Paul - Mon May 11, 2020 - Comments (0)
Category: Death, Comics, Books, Cartoons, 1990s, Fictional Monsters

Left-Foot Accelerator

Deadly crashes guaranteed, or your money back!



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Apr 22, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Death, Inventions, 1950s, Cars

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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