Category:
Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Deaf Applause

From the book Gestures by Roger E. Axtell:

How do the deaf signal applause? After all, they cannot hear the gratifying sound produced by applause. The answer is that they have adopted their own unique method of signaling enjoyment or approval. They raise their hands to shoulder or head height, palms outward, and shake them with a fast, almost shivering-like motion. Seeing an audience waggling their hands in that fashion can be just as rewarding as hearing a thundering round of applause.

I thought there would be plenty of clips on Youtube of this 'deaf applause,' but I could only find one, very brief example taken at an opera for the deaf in Denmark:

Posted By: Alex - Wed Oct 02, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Robert Wadlow Centennial



We are a bit late with this, but it's still well worth the viewing.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Sep 25, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Anniversary, Body, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical, Human Marvels

Douglas Bader, the Legless Ace



The Wikipedia page.

Bader joined the RAF in 1928, and was commissioned in 1930. In December 1931, while attempting some aerobatics, he crashed and lost both his legs. Having been on the brink of death, he recovered, retook flight training, passed his check flights and then requested reactivation as a pilot. Although there were no regulations applicable to his situation, he was retired against his will on medical grounds.[3]

After the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, however, Douglas Bader returned to the RAF and was accepted as a pilot. He scored his first victories over Dunkirk during the Battle of France in 1940. He then took part in the Battle of Britain and became a friend and supporter of Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory and his "Big Wing" experiments.

In August 1941, Bader baled out over German-occupied France and was captured. Soon afterward, he met and was befriended by Adolf Galland, a prominent German fighter ace.[4] Despite his disability, Bader made a number of escape attempts and was eventually sent to the prisoner of war camp at Colditz Castle. He remained there until April 1945 when the camp was liberated by the First United States Army.


He even featured in a comic. (Use link for readable copy of image below.)





Posted By: Paul - Mon Sep 16, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Accidents, War, Air Travel and Airlines, 1940s, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Polydactyly

I always knew about people born with extra fingers, but had not contemplated extra thumbs.

Wikipedia entry.



Source (warning: pics of surgery).

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 22, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Body, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical, Human Marvels

The Tomorrow People



Combine The Mod Squad with The X-Men and you have The Tomorrow People.

Wikipedia page here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Sep 06, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Human Marvels, Television, Comics, Science Fiction, 1970s, Europe, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Hunting Licenses for the Blind

It sounds like it should be a joke, but apparently in the past various states have debated whether they should issue hunting licenses for the blind. And today some states appear to issue such licenses. For instance, on the website of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game a "Resident Hunting License for the Blind" is listed as costing $45.00.

Pittsburgh Post Gazette - Dec 2, 1953



I think the clipping below explains these licenses. They allow blind people to go out hunting with their friends. Someone else (who can see) has to do the actual shooting, but the blind person can claim one of the game animals as their own kill.

Tallahassee Democrat - Apr 15, 1959



A separate issue is whether a blind person can purchase a regular hunting license. I don't know what the current laws are, but in 1963 in Washington state there was nothing to prevent them from doing so, as demonstrated by the stunt below in which blind attorney Arnold Sadler purchased a hunting license for himself.

Staunton News Leader - Jan 31, 1963

Posted By: Alex - Mon Sep 04, 2017 - Comments (6)
Category: Guns, Sports, Regulations, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Cosmetic Frame for Bent Legs



The vanished horrors of the past.

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Thu Jun 15, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Technology, 1920s, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

Television Set for the Differently Abled



Very forward-looking and thoughtful of Westinghouse to create a TV set that aided one-handed people. Of course, nowadays you only need one finger (on the remote) to tune!

Posted By: Paul - Fri Nov 27, 2015 - Comments (3)
Category: Television, Advertising, 1950s, Differently Abled, Handicapped, Challenged, and Otherwise Atypical

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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