Category:
Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art

Paperbacks from Hell



For Halloween or Xmas, what could be a better gift? A brilliant art and history book about the crazy-ass horror novel covers of yore?

Read a review here.



Posted By: Paul - Tue Oct 24, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Horror, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Books, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s

Village of the Giants



"From a novel by H. G. Wells!" Yeah, right....

The Wikipedia page.

The full movie, via MST3K.

Posted By: Paul - Sun Oct 22, 2017 - Comments (1)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Movies, Juvenile Delinquency, Teenagers, Science Fiction, 1960s

The Fish



An early forerunner of "Rock Lobster."

Posted By: Paul - Wed Oct 18, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Music, Nature, 1950s

Wild and Wonderful




From the Wikipedia entry:



Dick Vosburgh of The Independent commented, "Critics found it hard to accept that it had taken six writers to fashion the wafer-thin tale of a jazz flautist whose marriage to a French film star is threatened by the jealous tricks of Monsieur Cognac, her neurotic, alcoholic French poodle."[5] In his obituary for Tony Curtis in 2010, Dave Kehr dismissed the film as "disastrous," noting that Curtis was rebuilding his reputation after an earlier affair with Kaufmann, his co-star in Wild and Wonderful, and subsequent divorce from Janet Leigh.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Oct 03, 2017 - Comments (2)
Category: Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Movies, Dogs, 1960s

The Beachcomber Bar, UK



Anglo Hula: less is not more.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Aug 11, 2017 - Comments (4)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, 1960s, Dance, Parody, Europe, South Pacific

The Beachcombers



The longest-running English-language show on Canadian TV looks just awful. How could it be otherwise, with this premise, as detailed in their Wikipedia entry.

The Beachcombers followed the life of Nick Adonidas (Bruno Gerussi), a Greek-Canadian log salvager in British Columbia who earned a living travelling the coastline northwest of Vancouver with his partner Jesse Jim (Pat John) aboard their logging tug Persephone tracking down logs that had broken away from barges and logging booms. Their chief business competitor is Relic (Robert Clothier) (whose actual name is Stafford T. Phillips), a somewhat unsavoury person who will occasionally go to great lengths to steal business (and logs) away from Nick. The series also focused on a supporting cast of characters in Nick's hometown of Gibsons, often centering on a café, Molly's Reach, run by Molly (Rae Brown), a mother figure to virtually all the characters in the series (including Relic). Molly had two grandchildren living with her, Hughie (Bob Park) and his younger sister Margaret played by Nancy Chapple in the first season then by Juliet Randall from the second season onward.


There are some full episodes on YouTube if anyone is brave enough to watch. Maybe a Canadian WU-vie will fill us in!

Posted By: Paul - Sun Aug 06, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Nature, Natural Resources, 1970s

Mystery Illustration 51



Which internationally famous best-selling singer of the 1970s is this supposed to be?

Answer is here.

And after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Thu Jul 20, 2017 - Comments (3)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, 1970s

Toys Are Made for Children



Sometimes the writer masters the metaphor, and sometimes the metaphor masters the writer.

"You keep me jumpin' in your hopscotch world."

Posted By: Paul - Sat Jul 08, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Fey, Twee, Whimsical, Naive and Sadsack, Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Music, 1960s

Mystery Illustration 49



Who is this titanic figure of 20th-century history, whose face should be instantly familiar?

Original illo here (page 14).

Answer also after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Wed Jul 05, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Comics, Twentieth Century

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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