Category:
Inventions

The GE Blue Max Radio



Posted By: Paul - Thu Aug 01, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Design and Designers, Inventions, Technology, 1960s

Shoo: The Deterrer of Pooping Dogs

Thirteen-year-old Noah De La Paz of California has invented a device to stop dogs from pooping on the lawn of his family’s house. It uses a camera and image-detection software. When a dog is identified, his device emits a high-pitched sound to encourage the dog to move on. Although still in the prototype stage, Noah hopes to eventually bring his invention to market.

I can see some potential problems with his invention. Such as that it doesn't seem to differentiate between pooping and non-pooping dogs. But even so, it sure would beat the currently most popular method of preventing unwanted poopers, which is to put up angry, threatening signs on your lawn.

More info: Spectrum News

Posted By: Alex - Thu Jul 11, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Inventions, Excrement, Dogs

Mystery Gadget 78



What's it for?

The answer is here.

Or after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jul 01, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Inventions, Chindogu

The Hollister Wind Bag

Patented by Thomas Lloyd Hollister in 1939. He called it a “gas receptor.” Basically, it was a fart collection bag. From the patent:

This invention relates to a device for receiving and storing gas formed by the digestion of foods. An object of the invention is the provision of a device for collecting and storing gas formed in the alimentary tract of the body and for absorbing liquids from the gases. Another object of the invention is the provision of a device for collecting and storing gas formed in the digestive tract, said device being removably suspended from the body and provided with a nipple having shielded perforations to permit gases to enter a storage chamber.



Posted By: Alex - Sat Mar 30, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Inventions, Flatulence, 1930s

The Ratapult

Invented circa 1992 by Allen Gross. It was intended to be a more humane rattrap. Instead of killing the rats, it flung them up to 50 feet into a cage or bucket. The dazed, but still living, rodents could then be either turned over to authorities or released into the wild. Noted Gross, “I didn’t want the (rodents) squashed or turned into meatloaf.”

Santa Rosa Press Democrat - Feb 14, 1992





Staunton News Leader - Feb 14, 1992



Turns out this wasn't the first rat-flinging trap to be invented. Back in 1912, a similar device debuted, also called the Ratapult. Though it wasn't intended to be in any way humane:

A metal arm, operated by a powerful spiral spring, is released, and, passing through a slot in the cavelike compartment in the manner of a catapult, it strikes the unfortunate rodent with a blow of sufficient force to break every bone in its body and hurl the carcass at least fifteen feet away from the trap, far enough away so other rats will not be warned against the trap.

Vergennes Orwell Citizen - Jan 9, 1913

Posted By: Alex - Sat Mar 23, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Inventions, Pests, Plagues and Infestations, 1990s

Prayer-Power Batteries

As explained by what-when-how.com:

The most distinctive practice of the Aetherius Society is its use of Spiritual Energy Batteries. The prayers and chanting of members are focused through trained leaders, and poured into a battery where they can be stored indefinitely. In times of crisis, such as war, earthquake or famine, thousands of hours of stored prayer energy can be released in one moment.

More info: Aetherius.org, wikipedia

A Prayer Battery being charged. via Aetherius.org.nz



Posted By: Alex - Sun Mar 03, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions, Religion, Technology

Jelly-Strength Tester

Invented in 1932 by C.R. Fellers and J.A. Clague of Massachusetts State College. It's technical name is the Fellers-Clague Penetrometer.

As is explained in The Complete Book on Gums and Stabilizers for Food Industry, there are two ways of testing the strength of jelly: 1) "tests in which the elastic limits (breaking strength) of the jellies are exceeded and the jelly is ruptured", or 2) "tests measuring deformation (sag) of jellies without exceeding the elastic limit."

The Fellers-Clague Penetrometer is of the first type.

Latrobe Bulletin - July 13, 1932




Source: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical Edition

Posted By: Alex - Sat Mar 02, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Food, Inventions, 1930s

Sphoon_Phork

A new device, calling itself the sphoon_phork, promises to transform your iPhone into a spoon or fork, so that you can eat with it as you browse social media.

It’s currently seeking funding as a kickstarter project.





Posted By: Alex - Tue Jan 29, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Inventions

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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