Category:
Motor Vehicles

Caccolube

Or, how to ruin an engine, courtesy of the OSS.



The "Caccolube" was a simple but effective device to disable an enemy vehicle. It was a condom filled with abrasive powders and crushed walnuts, and was dropped into an engine crankcase. "After the engine heats up," the OSS manual explained, "the hot oil will deteriorate the rubber sac and free the compound into the lubricating system.
"When circulated through this system, the compound fuses and welds the moving metal parts of the machinery. Slipped into a truck, the Caccolube takes effect after the truck has been driven from 30 to 50 miles. It reacts so thoroughly on pistons, cylinder walls and bearing journals that the vehicle is not only thrown out of service but the engine is destroyed beyond repair."
This lethal "lube job" replaced the original effort using sugar, when it was discovered that sugar actually promoted better engine performance in the vehicles of that era.
Source: Jack Anderson, "Rare arsenal used by spies," Santa Cruz Sentinel, Mar 9, 1987.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Sep 12, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Motor Vehicles, War, Weapons, Spies and Intelligence Services

The World’s Fastest Shed



Posted By: Paul - Wed Sep 02, 2020 - Comments (4)
Category: Eccentrics, Motor Vehicles, United Kingdom

1969 Design Proposals for NYC

A 200-MPH transit system, a dome over Times Square, and other daydreams.

Source.



Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 26, 2020 - Comments (3)
Category: Motor Vehicles, Urban Life, 1960s, Yesterday’s Tomorrows

Johnnie the Tractor-Driving Monkey

The 1977 video below features both Johnnie and his son, Johnnie II. But mostly Johnnie II.

The owner of both, Australian farmer Lindsay Schmidt, said of the original Johnnie:

"I trust him with my life driving the tractor. He can hold it on a hill and keep it from slowing down. You should see him holding that wheel as he skirts the hill and I work behind.

We take it in turns to drive and toss off the hay to the sheep and cattle."



Billings Gazette - Jan 17, 1965

Posted By: Alex - Fri Jul 24, 2020 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Farming, Motor Vehicles

Follies of the Madmen #456

Who knew gas pumps were such gossips?



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Dec 10, 2019 - Comments (6)
Category: Anthropomorphism, Business, Advertising, Motor Vehicles, 1940s

A Queer Ferry



I would call this an aerial tramway for cars. Seems it would have been much easier just to build a bridge!

Posted By: Paul - Wed Nov 27, 2019 - Comments (8)
Category: Engineering and Construction, Motor Vehicles, Technology, 1930s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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