Category:
Motor Vehicles

Follies of the Madmen #441



Not sure how a different color motor oil is better for your car. Don't think the advertiser can tell us either.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Aug 26, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Motor Vehicles, 1950s

License-Plate T-Shirt

Available from AdversarialFashion.com, which explains:

The patterns on the goods in this shop are designed to trigger Automated License Plate Readers, injecting junk data in to the systems used by the State and its contractors to monitor and track civilians and their locations.





via Book of Joe

Posted By: Alex - Tue Aug 13, 2019 - Comments (0)
Category: Fashion, Motor Vehicles

The Jetway 707

Built by American Quality Coach. Introduced in 1968. Its design was based on the 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado. Some more info from coachbuilt.com:

[American Quality Coach's] first product was an airport limousine - the AQC Jetway 707. It was 28' long with a wheelbase of 185", had 8-doors, seated twelve to fifteen, and featured twin rear axles - the first stretch limousine known to use them. The Jetway 707 featured an unusual vista-cruiser-style raised roof, with integral sky-lights and a completely enclosed cargo area with a hinged rear door.

A complete line of AQC hearses, ambulances, combination cars and limousines were planned, but unfortunately all of their working capital was tied up in the tooling for their first run of airport limos, and when they failed to sell, the firm was forced to abandon the other coaches. A current owner believes that only 52 Jetways were built between 1968-1970, although professional car historian Bernie DeWinter believes that the number is closer to 150.


Posted By: Alex - Mon May 20, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Motor Vehicles, Cars, 1960s

Dried Milk as Fuel



Source.


Posted By: Paul - Mon May 06, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Animals, Food, Motor Vehicles, Technology, 1930s

The Amazing License Plate Collection of Paul Franke

By chance, I recently happened to meet a fellow San Diegan, Paul Franke, who has in his garage a collection of 22,000 license plates. Of course, I was interested in seeing that, and he was kind enough to invite me over and spend an afternoon showing it to me.

I hadn't realized how popular license plate collecting is. The Automobile License Plate Collectors Association has almost 3000 members, and it holds an annual national convention, as well as smaller regional ones. But even within this large community of collectors, Paul's collection of 22,000 plates is very impressive.

Guinness lists the largest collection of license plates in the world as being that of Péter and Tamás Kenyeres who have 11,345 plates. Seeing that, I wondered if Paul actually had the true world record. But no, he assures me that Guinness is wrong. While his collection is undeniably large, he doubts it's even the biggest in San Diego County, and this BBC article indicates there's a collector in Florida with over 50,000 plates.



Paul stores his license plates thematically. Along one wall (above left) he has boxes of plates arranged by state. (He long ago acquired plates from every state.) On another wall (above right) he has boxes of plates with more random themes. For instance, he has a box of error plates. Can you spot the errors in the examples below?

(scroll to the bottom of this post for the answers)



More in extended >>

Posted By: Alex - Thu May 02, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Motor Vehicles, Collectors

Professor Burt, Endurance Pianist

"Lady nurse in attendance shaves him every day."



Source.



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Apr 16, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Eccentrics, Excess, Overkill, Hyperbole and Too Much Is Not Enough, Human Marvels, Motor Vehicles, Music, 1920s

1968 Seatbelt PSA



Nice to see that despite being horribly scarred for life, she has maintained her mascara, eyeliner and lashes.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Mar 22, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Accidents, Beauty, Ugliness and Other Aesthetic Issues, Motor Vehicles, PSA’s, 1960s, Face and Facial Expressions

The Seat That Burns

Concerned by an increasing number of attacks on cab drivers, Parisian taxi drivers in 1987 began outfitting their cars with a device called "le siege qui brule" ('the seat that burns'), which could electrify unruly passengers with 52,000 volts.

“With the push of a discreetly placed pedal, the taxi driver can send the electricity coursing for one second through the back seat, stunning the passenger with a jolt to the back of the neck.”

As far as I can tell, the devices were outlawed a few months after their introduction.



Hazleton Standard-Speaker - Oct 23, 1987

Posted By: Alex - Mon Mar 18, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Crime, Motor Vehicles, 1980s

The Unimog



This one has been turned into a camper.




Posted By: Paul - Sat Feb 16, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Motor Vehicles

Follies of the Madmen #407



"Murray Westgate portrays an Esso service station dealer who asks a woman driver if she wants Esso Extra gasoline, but she only wants her windows cleaned."

Not sure if Murray peeved attitude conveys the right message. Also, perhaps a bit too much thrilling window-scrubbing action?

Posted By: Paul - Mon Jan 21, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Business, Advertising, Corporate Mascots, Icons and Spokesbeings, Motor Vehicles, 1960s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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