Category:
Music

Always Elvis Wine

Always Elvis wine was released in 1979, two years after Elvis's death. The front label had a picture of Elvis, while the back label featured a poem by Col. Tom Parker.

Parker reportedly said that Always Elvis was the kind of wine Elvis "would have drunk if he'd liked the stuff."

At the time it sold for $4 a bottle. Now an unopened bottle of it will cost you upwards of $150.

However, there are other, newer Elvis Presley wines on the market, such as 'The King' wine, available at ElvisPresleyWines.com.



Chicago Tribune - Nov 4, 1979

Posted By: Alex - Fri Aug 27, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Celebrities, Inebriation and Intoxicants, Music

The Ballad of a Gentle Laxative

These 1987 TV ads for Doxidan laxative, featuring the 'Doxidan Cowboy,' seem to inspire both love and hate. A lot of people on YouTube remember them fondly, but in newspapers from the time they were often cited as being among the most annoying commercials on TV.

The singer was Skeeter Starke. He has a YouTube channel.





Fort Myers News-Press - Jan 25, 1987



via History's Dumpster

Posted By: Alex - Thu Aug 26, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Music, Advertising, Excrement, 1980s

Immaculate Heart Trio

The Immaculate Heart Trio consisted of three sisters from the Immaculate Heart order who also happened to be biological sisters.

Miami Herald Sun - Nov 17, 1957



You can listen to one of their albums on YouTube, but only on YouTube because embedding is disabled.

Posted By: Alex - Sat Aug 14, 2021 - Comments (4)
Category: Family, Music, Religion

Soundblast

Soundblast was a 1956 album by the duo Arthur Ferrante and Louis Teicher who met while studying at the Juilliard School of Music. It was marketed as space-age music representative of the kind of music that inhabitants of the "remotest worlds" might listen to.

But the real gimmick of the album was that all the sounds on it, including the percussion, was produced by pianos. Details from the Miami News (Nov 17, 1957):

They perform their hi-fi-jinks on two "gimmicked" Steinways by alternately muting, plucking, strumming and beating on the strings. What comes out they describe as the "sound of tomorrow."

Nor does either of them hesitate to use his elbow, forearms or knuckles to elicit a desired chordal effect—not to mention an assortment of wooden and metal gadgets designed to give the pianos a new personality...

Their goal always is to achieve the maximum tonal contrasts and to simulate orchestral color as vividly as possible within the limitations of pianistic dynamics.

More info: The Soundblast liner notes



Miami News - Nov 17, 1957



Wikipedia has an interesting biographical detail about Ferrante. Apparently he died in 2009, twelve days after his 88th birthday, thereby fulfilling his ambition to live one year for each piano key.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Aug 12, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Music, Space-age Bachelor Pad & Exotic, 1950s

Walk On By

The elegance, beauty and singing talent of Dionne Warwick are embedded in a totally surreal video. Paris rooftop, stuffed cat, crowd of silent men...

Posted By: Paul - Thu Aug 05, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Music, Surrealism, 1960s, Europe, Dolls and Stuffed Animals

Disco Felon

A "disco felon" is a medical condition caused by snapping one's fingers too much to disco music. It was first reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The original article is behind a paywall, but Edward Nash provided some details in the journal Science Year 1982:

"Disco felon"... was reported to NEJM by Frederick W. Walker and other doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore in July 1979. "A 17-year-old girl came to the emergency room complaining of an infected finger," they wrote. "Physical examination showed... a classic felon [a painful inflammation of the finger, usually near the fingernail] of the left middle finger... the patient had noticed a small crack on her finger... She thought that the crack might have resulted from snapping her fingers while she was disco dancing..."

The doctors treated the girl by draining and bandaging the inflammation. She recovered, but Walker and his associates sounded a dire warning to other disco dancers and their doctors. "Disco dancing may eventually be shown to damage a variety of body systems: namely visual, auditory, orthopedic, and nutritional. [Nutritional] damage might result from self-imposed starvation in an attempt... to wear the latest outfits."

A correspondent to the NEJM later suggested that "disco digit" might be a less confusing name for the condition.

Posted By: Alex - Tue Jul 27, 2021 - Comments (3)
Category: Health, Music, 1970s

He’d Have To Get Out And Get Under (To Fix Up His Automobile)



"I have a daughter who's hungry for love. She likes to ride every day."

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jul 23, 2021 - Comments (0)
Category: Innuendo, Double Entendres, Symbolism, Nudge-Nudge-Wink-Wink and Subliminal Messages, Music, 1910s, Cars, Love & Romance

Concret PH

A 1958 composition by Iannis Xenakis. Some info about it from YouTube:

Concret PH, the title being a reference to the architectural design and construction material, is a crackling two minutes of pointillistic sounds. Xenakis recorded the sound of burning charcoal, then layered and transposed the recordings to create evolving densities and ranges of snaps, crackles, and pops. This piece, along with Varèse's Poème électronique, remains a classic of the electroacoustic genre.

It has the virtue of being short. But he should have titled it 'Music to eat Rice Krispies by'.

Posted By: Alex - Sun Jul 18, 2021 - Comments (1)
Category: Music, 1950s

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Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction, science-themed books such as Elephants on Acid and Psychedelic Apes.

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Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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