Category:
Natural Resources

Oyster Flatulence

I didn't even realize that oysters produced flatulence, but I guess this is now something new to worry about.

A study published in the Scientific Reports journal shows that clams, mussels and oysters produce one-tenth of methane and nitrous oxide gases in the Baltic Sea as a result of digestion. Therefore, researchers have warned that shellfish “may play an important but overlooked role in regulating greenhouse gas production”.


More info: euractiv.com
Original study: nature.com

Posted By: Alex - Wed Oct 18, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Nature, Natural Resources

Navassa Island:  Guano Capital of the USA




Wikipedia page.

Navassa Island was claimed for the United States on September 19, 1857, by Peter Duncan, an American sea captain, under the Guano Islands Act of 1856, for the rich guano deposits found on the island, and for not being within the lawful jurisdiction of any other government, nor occupied by another government's citizens.




Article from 2012 here.

Posted By: Paul - Sat Sep 02, 2017 - Comments (0)
Category: Business, Excrement, Natural Resources, Nineteenth Century

The Beachcombers



The longest-running English-language show on Canadian TV looks just awful. How could it be otherwise, with this premise, as detailed in their Wikipedia entry.

The Beachcombers followed the life of Nick Adonidas (Bruno Gerussi), a Greek-Canadian log salvager in British Columbia who earned a living travelling the coastline northwest of Vancouver with his partner Jesse Jim (Pat John) aboard their logging tug Persephone tracking down logs that had broken away from barges and logging booms. Their chief business competitor is Relic (Robert Clothier) (whose actual name is Stafford T. Phillips), a somewhat unsavoury person who will occasionally go to great lengths to steal business (and logs) away from Nick. The series also focused on a supporting cast of characters in Nick's hometown of Gibsons, often centering on a café, Molly's Reach, run by Molly (Rae Brown), a mother figure to virtually all the characters in the series (including Relic). Molly had two grandchildren living with her, Hughie (Bob Park) and his younger sister Margaret played by Nancy Chapple in the first season then by Juliet Randall from the second season onward.


There are some full episodes on YouTube if anyone is brave enough to watch. Maybe a Canadian WU-vie will fill us in!

Posted By: Paul - Sun Aug 06, 2017 - Comments (5)
Category: Ineptness, Crudity, Talentlessness, Kitsch, and Bad Art, Nature, Natural Resources, 1970s

Big Role for Rock



Here's my question: who the hell ever first thunk up this elaborate, non-intuitive processing of gypsum, a rock out of the ground? The ingenuity of mankind and our genius ancestors is awesome and baffling.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Dec 11, 2015 - Comments (4)
Category: Technology, Industry, Factories and Manufacturing, 1950s, Natural Resources

The Brown Line

image
The number 2 bus runs on number 2 so I figure that's the brown line.

Posted By: patty - Mon Mar 16, 2015 - Comments (9)
Category: Garbage, Trash, Waste and Other Detritus, Mass Transit, Utilities and Power Generation, Excrement, Natural Resources, Bus

Urine-tricity

image
Lighting up the restroom with power produced from urine deposited therein, brilliant!

Posted By: patty - Sat Mar 07, 2015 - Comments (1)
Category: Bathrooms, Body Fluids, Natural Resources, Power Generation

Regretably Prophetic Oil Company Ad

image image
[In two halves: click each to enlarge]

Original ad here.

Posted By: Paul - Wed Aug 01, 2012 - Comments (11)
Category: Business, Advertising, Products, Nature, Natural Resources, Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, 1960s

Guga

image

The tradition.

The controversy.

The taste.

Eating guga is an experience that can produce a lump in the throat, tears in the eyes. Tears of nostalgia, to those for whom it is part of a cultural identity - for others, simply a response to the urge to regurgitate.

The guga is a fishy-tasting seabird, highly prized in its own area for its unique taste. Yet to others living a mere 20 miles away, it is incredible that something so foul can even be taken into the mouth, let alone enjoyed.

The guga, however, is unique to the Isle of Lewis. When exiles meet in far-flung places, the talk soon turns to guga and memories of sharing this . . . delicacy. As the ache of nostalgia creeps in, soon they long to plunge knife and fork into this plump seabird, a 3lb baby gannet. And so it is that barrels of guga, salted down in the summer, wend their way across the world to destinations as far away as New Zealand to bring a taste of home (the sweaty, fishy, oily taste of the scuppers of a fishing smack).


Posted By: Paul - Tue Aug 09, 2011 - Comments (7)
Category: Food, Regionalism, Foreign Customs, Europe, Natural Resources

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

Our banner was drawn by the legendary underground cartoonist Rick Altergott.

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