Category:
Technology

Laundry-Folding Robot

The Foldimate. Hoping to be available for purchase by the end of this year. Target price: $980.

I could see that it might be a useful convenience in places with shared laundry facilities, like apartment buildings. But it would seem a bit extravagant for a single-family home.

Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 18, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Technology, AI, Robots and Other Automatons

Pressure Gauge Watch

Called the PSI watch, it's designed to look like a pressure gauge. So much so that the markings on the dial indicate units of pressure rather than time. And there's only a single hand, which rests at the 0 mark.

So how can you use it to actually tell the time? That's a little complicated. First you need to press the button on the side, then the needle will move three times: first to the hour, then to the ten minute group, and finally to the single minutes. You need to do this each time you want to know the time.

The intended market for this, I assume, is either people who like weird watches, or people who really like pressure gauges.

Available from Tokyoflash for $189.





Posted By: Alex - Thu Apr 11, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Technology

The Incassomat



Foto source.

In 1936, banks invented “the Incassomat” or “robot cashier”, a machine to facilitate deposit making and withdrawals, to improve record keeping and reduce human errors in transactions. Soon, banks piloting it realized the cost of operating it was too high compared with the benefits of error correction.


Text source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Apr 08, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Money, Technology, 1930s

Mystery Gadget 72



What's this device do? Hint: it involves distances.

The answer is here.

Or after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Thu Apr 04, 2019 - Comments (4)
Category: Technology, 1930s

Porpoise Oil or Locust Oil:  Your choice!



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Fri Mar 29, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Animals, Insects, Technology, 1920s

Prayer-Power Batteries

As explained by what-when-how.com:

The most distinctive practice of the Aetherius Society is its use of Spiritual Energy Batteries. The prayers and chanting of members are focused through trained leaders, and poured into a battery where they can be stored indefinitely. In times of crisis, such as war, earthquake or famine, thousands of hours of stored prayer energy can be released in one moment.

More info: Aetherius.org, wikipedia

A Prayer Battery being charged. via Aetherius.org.nz



Posted By: Alex - Sun Mar 03, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Inventions, Religion, Technology

Mystery Gadget 71

This was equipment aboard a large ocean liner. What did it do?

Answer is here, or after the jump.



More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Sun Mar 03, 2019 - Comments (5)
Category: Oceans and Maritime Pursuits, Technology, 1930s

Follies of the Madmen #414



Source.

Posted By: Paul - Mon Feb 25, 2019 - Comments (3)
Category: Business, Advertising, Technology, Sex Symbols, Appliances, 1960s

Follies of the Madmen #406



Joe Louis lives in your car's engine.

Source.

Posted By: Paul - Tue Jan 15, 2019 - Comments (1)
Category: Business, Advertising, Sports, Technology, 1930s

Mystery Gadget 70



What is this tool used for?

Answer is here.

Or after the jump.

More in extended >>

Posted By: Paul - Fri Jan 11, 2019 - Comments (2)
Category: Technology, 1980s

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Who We Are
Alex Boese
Alex is the creator and curator of the Museum of Hoaxes. He's also the author of various weird, non-fiction books such as Elephants on Acid.

Paul Di Filippo
Paul has been paid to put weird ideas into fictional form for over thirty years, in his career as a noted science fiction writer. He has recently begun blogging on many curious topics with three fellow writers at The Inferior 4+1.

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